lake erie

NASA Glenn Research Center

As Great Lakes advocates lobby Congress this week, a new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency details how the federal government and states plan to fight algae blooms in Lake Erie. But the agency isn't proposing more federal regulations to accomplish the task.

Lake Erie Distillery Turns Booze Into Fish Food

Mar 2, 2018
Angelica A. Morrison / Great Lakes Today

Out on farmland in western New York, near the shore of Lake Erie, is Five & 20 Spirits And Brewing. Here, they make more than just booze – they also raise fish.

Canada and the province of Ontario recently released their plan to combat toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.  Phosphorus is the primary cause of the blooms that turn parts of the lake green most summers.

The U.S. and Canada hope to reduce phosphorus in Lake Erie by 40 percent, from 2008 levels.  It’s all part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Ohio and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have settled a lawsuit over dredging in the Cuyahoga River.  

The state and the federal agency have fought for years over how to handle sediment scooped from the river. The Army Corps wanted to dump it into Lake Erie, but the state said that was unsafe.

Under the settlement, the Army Corps will bear the cost of disposing of sediment dredged in 2016 and 2017. That material was placed in confined disposal facilities, not in the lake.

The settlement was filed Wednesday in federal court in Cleveland.

NASA Glenn Research Center

The U.S. EPA has withdrawn its acceptance of the Ohio EPA’s assessment of impaired waterways, in a decision that’s being hailed by local politicians. The federal agency changed its mind because the assessment did not account for Lake Erie’s open waters.


Some Ohio State University researchers are starting a three-year study looking for keys to predicting, mitigating, controlling, or even preventing harmful algal blooms in rivers and streams all over the country. 

If you like ice, you have to love the Great Lakes, where it comes in all shapes and sizes. With the recent deep freeze, we're seeing a lot more ice than in the past few winters -- including a frosty Niagara Falls. ​Here's a look at some unusual shapes and sizes:

Over the past two winters, there wasn’t much ice cover on the Great Lakes. That changed with this month’s deep freeze.

Frigid temperatures have frozen more than 40% of Lake Erie’s surface, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or NOAA.  Scientists there predict ice cover could jump to almost 90% by Sunday. This time last year, ice barely covered 2% of the lake.

It's an annual tradition in the Great Lakes: setting up an ice boom across the eastern end of Lake Erie. 

The boom -- a series of pontoons that stretches nearly two miles -- is designed to cut down on ice jams that could damage properties and the hydroelectric power plant intakes along the Niagara River.

On the Great Lakes, boat and ship traffic is slowing down for the winter.  Meanwhile, in Cleveland, residents have a chance to watch Lake Erie change as ice builds up -- and breaks up – it’s part of an unusual public art exhibit called Waiting for a Break, by Ohio artist Julia Christiansen.  

On a large screen downtown, 6 live video feeds show different spots along Lake Erie. One shows waves lapping over rocks, others show a remote island and a nearby bay.