infrastructure

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray, left, and Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine wave to the crowd before a debate at Marietta College on Monday.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

The Republican and Democratic candidates for governor met for their second face-to-face debate, this time taking questions from an audience and via social media at Marietta College.

The candidates were asked about energy, education, the environment and ECOT, the online charter school that closed earlier this year owing millions of dollars to the state for overinflating student attendance.

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

Voters in Gahanna will decide in November whether to approve an income tax hike, putting the city's tax in line with Columbus but above other suburbs. City leaders say it's necessary because of a projected budget shortfall and delayed infrastructure projects, but the proposal has drawn the ire of local business owners.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

The Democrat who wants to be Ohio’s next governor says the state needs to repair its roads and bridges, make sure all of the state has access to broadband internet, and invest in public transportation.

Ohio State Sen. Joe Schiavoni
John Minchillo / AP

Democratic leaders are calling on the state to release some of the $2.7 billion in the state’s Rainy Day Fund. One senator says that money can be used to invest in the people.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Ohio's candidates for governor appear to have different approaches on how they’d pay for infrastructure, as construction costs rise and gas tax revenue declines.

A national transportation research group says Ohio's roadways are deteriorated and congested, costing drivers $12 billion each year. Yup, that's "billion" with a "b."

Rager Photographic Company / Columbus Library

As part of our Curious Cbus series, WOSU collects questions from listeners and investigates the answers. But since the project started, a lot of the questions we've received have centered around various Columbus streets and where their names came from.

Mark Urycki / ideastream

Matthew Woodyard loves cycling so much he’s taken up something called cyclocross – think of it as a biking form of cross-country-running with a few laps around the track mixed in. He also rides his bike to work up and down the steep hills of the Merriman Valley.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

On the west side of Scioto Audubon Metro Park in downtown Columbus, people mount climbing walls, play on beach volleyball courts and ride down bike paths.

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

While President Trump and the Russia investigation continue to dominate headlines, for Sen. Sherrod Brown, the top concerns on Capitol Hill this week are net neutrality, NAFTA, health care and infrastructure.

The first thing you notice as the bucket truck lowers you over the side of the Jeremiah Morrow Bridge is just how quiet it is only a few feet below the side of the bridge. The second thing you notice is just how high up you really are.

Doug Kerr / Flickr

Spring has arrived, though it may not feel like it, and constructions crews are rolling out all around Ohio to begin nearly 1,000 road improvement projects. The Ohio Department of Transportation is touting this as a big year to improve connectivity.

Nick Evans

Mayor Andrew Ginther wants to spend more than a billion dollars on infrastructure projects in 2018. 

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

President Trump visited Ohio on Thursday to pitch Americans on his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. In front of a crowd of builders at a training facility for construction equipment operators in Richfield, Ohio, Trump began in typical fashion—with a boast.

Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown
John Minchillo / Associated Press

President Donald Trump visited Ohio on Thursday touting his new plan to bolster infrastructure projects by injecting $200 billion of federal money. But Ohio's Democratic U.S. Senator says Trump is not holding up his campaign promises.

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