Immigration

Updated at 3:44 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed the Trump administration a setback over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

The court declined to take up a key case dealing with the Obama-era DACA — for now.

The high court said an appeals court should hear the case first. The result is DACA will stay in place until or if the Supreme Court takes it up.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

When it comes to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program and Congress, no one seems to know what comes next.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

The Senate failed to pass any immigration legislation before a self-imposed Friday deadline, leaving lawmakers with no plan to address the roughly 700,000 immigrants who stand to lose legal protections as early as March 5.

The defeat follows a rocky 24 hours of negotiations on a bipartisan bill that failed following a veto threat from President Trump. By a 39-60 vote, senators rejected a White House-backed plan that became a partisan lightning rod after Trump insisted his plan was the only one he would sign.

Immigration Debate Grips Congress

Feb 15, 2018
Protesters in San Francisco, September 5, 2017.
Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has launched a bipartisan debate regarding immigration reform. A path to citizenship for immigrants brought to U.S. by their parents as children, and a southern border wall are among the top policy issues at play. President Trump has already stated he won't sign any bill that doesn't meet of all his demands. 

We'll talk about the status of the debate and the future of immigration policy.

A federal judge in New York has ruled that the Trump administration cannot end the Obama-era program designed to protect from deportation young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

The House passed a bill Tuesday evening to avert a government shutdown on Thursday, as Senate leaders still hope to clear the way for years of budget harmony this week with a long-term spending agreement.

But as Congress worked on keeping things running, President Trump made a fresh call to shut down the government over immigration.

With another government shutdown looming this week, Senate Democrats, including Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown, are still hoping to strike a deal on protections for the undocumented immigrants known as "Dreamers." But at a news conference Monday, Brown suggested that failure to reach an agreement on the issue is "unlikely" to result in another shutdown.

Federal immigration officers will continue their practice of going into federal, state and local courthouses seeking to arrest undocumented immigrants, despite the objections of immigrant advocates and some judges, including the chief justice of California.

In a two-page policy directive signed by the deputy director of U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Thomas Homan, agents will take

In 2012, as Syria's internal unrest deepened into full-scale civil war, Syrians living in the U.S. were offered an opportunity: If they met certain conditions and paid the requisite fees, they could register for temporary protection from deportation — and avoid having to return to the violence that awaited them back home.

About a hundred people gathered in the park across from the West Side Market a few hours before President Trump's State of the Union.
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Just hours before President Trump’s State of the Union called for big cuts in legal immigration and continuing crackdowns on undocumented immigrants, about a hundred people gathered across from Cleveland’s West Side Market to rally for immigrants and refugees.

The gathering included a phone call from a Youngstown businessman less than a day after his deportation to Jordan.

Of the 690,000 undocumented immigrants now facing an uncertain future as Congress and President Trump wrangle over the DACA program are about 8,800 school teachers.

The real possibility that they'll be deported if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is allowed to expire has put enormous stress on them.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

The decades-long battle of Youngstown businessman Amer Adi to remain in the U.S. is coming to a close, leaving a trail of unanswered questions about his deportation case. In Youngstown, it’s left a lot of people feeling his loss is their loss.

Esther Honig

On a Thursday morning, Officer Khaled Bahgat drives his police cruiser to the Northeast side of Columbus. There, in an aging apartment development, lives a significant concentration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Youngstown businessman Amer Othman Adi lost his final bid to remain in the country on Thursday, when immigration officials turned down a special request for a stay from the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. His family went to say goodbye at the private prison where he’s been held and emerged bewildered and angry. 

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

In recent weeks, President Trump has told lawmakers he would sign any immigration measure that Congress sent him but also flatly rejected a draft of a deal negotiated by six senators.

Now, the White House is laying out the specific elements it wants to see from a bill offering permanent protection for people in the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

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