Immigration

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says that the government will meet deadlines imposed by a federal judge to reunite migrant families that have been separated by the U.S. government.

At the same time, he criticized the deadlines as "artificial" and said that they could prevent the government "from completing our standard — or even a truncated — vetting process."

The Trump administration's separation policy has been met with widespread outcry, marches and legal action.

A new liberal rallying cry — "Abolish ICE!" — calls for an end to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that enforces President Trump's immigration policies.

Many protesters held signs with the slogan at marches across the country over the weekend, and several leading Democrats echoed the grass-roots catchphrase.

In a legal setback for the Trump administration's immigration policies, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that the government may not arbitrarily detain people seeking asylum.

The ruling comes in a case challenging the administration's policy of detaining people even after they have passed a credible fear interview and await a hearing on their asylum claim.

The 2020 Census

Jul 2, 2018
US Census Bureau / Wikimedia Commons

The 2020 census has run into some hurdles as officials work towards preparing for the country wide survey. The Trump administration has suggested adding a question regarding the respondents citizenship status while the officials consider the cost of moving the mainly paper taken survey to an online platform.

Join us today as we consider the issues concerning the 2020 census and how it could impact states and government funded programs. 

Protesters gathered in major cities and small towns across the United States to denounce President Trump's immigration policies.

The "Families Belong Together" marches were planned in response to the administration's policy of separating children from their parents at the southern border.

Protestors rally in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program known as DACA outside the offices of Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, Sept. 5, 2017, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / AP

Activists in Columbus will be holding a rally at the Ohio Statehouse on Saturday morning, in conjunction with over 600 events across the country protesting the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Nearly 600 women were arrested Thursday in one of several demonstrations across the country protesting the Trump administration's treatment of migrant families at the southern border.

The Department of Defense plans to start building tent encampments on two military bases in Texas to house migrant families apprehended at the border. Construction is expected to begin after the July 4 holiday.

The Pentagon said in a statement that the Department of Homeland Security asked the Defense Department to house and care for an "alien family population" of up to 12,000 people.

The Trump administration is on a deadline to reunite families separated at the southern border. On Tuesday, a federal judge ruled that all families have to be reunited within 30 days. But advocates and activists who have already been trying to reconnect individual migrant children with their parents say their experiences suggest the process of reunification will be complicated.

A case in point is Emily Kephart, who works for a nonprofit called Kids in Need of Defense, or KIND.

A federal judge in San Diego has barred the separation of migrant children and ordered that those currently detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy be reunited with families within 30 days.

In the sharply divided decision over President Trump's travel ban, the Supreme Court repudiated a notorious case from the last century: one that justified the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed to what she called "stark parallels" between the 1944 Korematsu decision and Tuesday's ruling, which upheld Trump administration restrictions on would-be visitors from Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Somalia and Yemen.

Leaders with the Cincinnati chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) say they're upset about Tuesday's Supreme Court ruling in Trump v. Hawaii.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

In a 5-4 ruling that gave broad leeway to presidential authority, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban that barred nearly all travelers from five mainly Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

The president's proclamation was "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority under the INA," the court wrote in its majority opinion, referring to the Immigration and Nationality Act.

"A moment of profound vindication"

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET

Despite pressure from President Trump for the U.S. to arrest and prosecute anyone caught crossing the border illegally, U.S. Customs and Border Protection says its agents will temporarily suspend the practice of detaining adults who arrive with children — something that had been a tenet of Trump's "zero tolerance" policy.

Immigration arrest at a garden center in Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Two of the largest workplace immigration raids yet under the Trump administration, carried out just weeks apart in Ohio, have upended the lives of hundreds of children caught in the middle.

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