government shutdown

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

Congressional Republicans keep trying to downplay the possibility of a government shutdown this fall, just weeks ahead of midterm elections, even as President Trump returns again and again to that very scenario.

Updated at 3:08 p.m.

We noted on Friday that the emerging theme of the 2018 elections is volatility.

"Frankly it is about volatility," a Republican campaign operative told NPR.

Updated at 2:21 p.m. ET

President Trump signed a massive spending bill Friday, hours after threatening a veto that would have triggered a government shutdown.

Updated at 12:55 a.m. ET Friday

The Senate voted early Friday to pass a roughly $1.3 trillion spending bill to fund the government through Sept. 3. The move avoided a government shutdown.

Congressional negotiators delayed the release of a $1.3 trillion spending bill Tuesday as the clock ticked closer to a Friday shutdown deadline amid battles over more than a dozen unresolved policy matters.

Leaders originally planned to release the details of the bill over the weekend but the spending talks remain mired in fights over immigration, gun control and health care.

Ohio U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown backed a two-year budget deal that could push federal deficit spending past a trillion dollars by next year. But Brown argues GOP lawmakers are responsible for a fair share of the red ink.

In a rare show of congressional cooperation, Republican and Democratic leaders in the Senate announced a two-year budget deal Wednesday that would increase federal spending for defense as well as key domestic priorities, including many health programs.

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

The House passed a bill Tuesday evening to avert a government shutdown on Thursday, as Senate leaders still hope to clear the way for years of budget harmony this week with a long-term spending agreement.

But as Congress worked on keeping things running, President Trump made a fresh call to shut down the government over immigration.

With another government shutdown looming this week, Senate Democrats, including Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown, are still hoping to strike a deal on protections for the undocumented immigrants known as "Dreamers." But at a news conference Monday, Brown suggested that failure to reach an agreement on the issue is "unlikely" to result in another shutdown.

Rob Portman speaking
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio's Republican U.S. Senator, Rob Portman, says he cannot know how he will vote on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program until a full bill is presented.

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