gerrymandering

Sen. Vernon Sykes (D-Akron, right) laughs with Secretary of State Jon Husted after the Ballot Board vote. Sykes was part of the group that negotiated the deal between lawmakers and citizen groups.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

A plan to change the way the state’s map of Congressional districts will be drawn after the 2020 census will be on the May ballot as Issue 1.

Even as Democrats and Republicans spend 2018 vying to win key races around the country, a larger legal battle underway this year could reshape the American political map — literally.

By June, the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to decide three major redistricting cases — out of Wisconsin, Maryland and Texas — that will lay some of the foundation for what the maps will look like, not just this year, but after the 2020 census that could affect control of Congress for the next decade.

The state of those legal cases and other key ones (that could affect 2018 and 2020) are below.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., delivers remarks following President Barack Obama's statement announcing Holder's departure, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Sept. 25, 2014.
Chuck Kennedy / President Obama White House Archive

A Democratic group backed by former President Barack Obama plans to invest millions of dollars in state-level elections in 11 states this year, with its heaviest focus on Ohio.

Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Franklin County’s two sitting Congressional representatives are happy about the redistricting compromise heading for the May ballot.

Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

It’s highly likely Ohio voters will get to vote on a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional districts map in May. The House approved a plan Tuesday that passed the Senate unanimously the night before.

The passage comes in time for lawmakers to make the February 7 deadline for putting the issue before voters in May.

Ohio Congressional Map for 113th Congress
U.S. Geological Survey

A deal has been reached to reform the way Ohio’s Congressional district map is drawn, after weeks of difficult negotiations between Republicans, Democrats and a citizens group that wanted to put its own plan on the fall ballot.

Under the new plan, the map drawing power stays with state lawmakers, but with new rules.

Updated at 4:08 p.m. ET

Pennsylvania will soon have new congressional maps.

The United States Supreme Court has decided not to block a state court ruling requiring Pennsylvania's Legislature to immediately redraw its legislative boundaries.

Pennsylvania's state Supreme Court had previously ruled those 18 congressional districts — drawn by a Republican Legislature and signed by a Republican governor in 2011 — were overly partisan and violated the state Constitution.

Reps. Vernon Sykes (D-Akron) and Matt Huffman (R-Lima) chaired the 2015 campaign for Issue 1 on Statehouse redistricting. Now in the Senate, Huffman is working on a Congressional redistricting plan he says will be similar.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

After a week of closed-door negotiations that failed to reach a compromise, state lawmakers have added a rare Monday afternoon session, in case they need to vote on changing the way Ohio’s Congressional map is drawn.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

At an Associated Press political forum on Thursday, Gov. John Kasich covered a lot of ground, talking about jobs, the economy, the opioid crisis and his future plans. For now, he says he’s willing to step in to help Republican lawmakers and citizens’ groups work out a deal on Ohio’s Congressional map-drawing process.

Fair Districts Ohio / Facebook

Closed-door negotiations over a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional map have broken down. Ohio lawmakers and representatives from citizens’ groups left the Statehouse late Wednesday night without coming to an agreement.

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