Fordham Institute

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Two national education advocacy groups say Ohio could be doing better when it comes to its annual school report cards. Both groups say they’re too complicated.

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Nearly one-third of teachers in Ohio's traditional public schools are chronically absent, but the rate in charter schools is significantly less. That’s according to a report released this week by the right-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that operates more than a dozen charter schools in the state.

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Ohio’s high school juniors may head into their summer break uncertain about what they need to do to earn a high school diploma. At the moment, they must reach a certain score on seven end of course tests. But that is likely to change.

High schools around the state are facing a crucial dilemma as about a third of students are not on track to graduate. That’s based on the new graduation standards that begin with the class of 2018. Now leaders are moving quickly to find a way to remedy the approaching crisis.

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A pro-school choice group says Ohio’s new laws to create oversight and transparency on charter schools are working. The study claims that the law is weeding out the bad schools.

State Board of Education member Tess Elshoff wrote the resolution to create a work group for further study.
Mark Urycki

The State Board of Education is holding off plan to enforce strict new graduation requirements for high school students. The change came when local school superintendents said nearly 30 percent of students may not make it.

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Leaders of top-ranking charter schools in Ohio say more money is needed to pay for quality teachers and more spacious facilities if the sector is to thrive.