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Mark Zuckerberg speaking at Facebook event.
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More than 50 million Facebook user accounts were hacked last week. It’s the tech company’s largest data breach in history, as data for other companies Facebook owns were also potentially compromised. 

Today on All Sides, what happens when the largest social media company gets hacked, microchip implants, and more.

Updated 5:37 p.m. ET

Facebook says that it has discovered a security breach affecting nearly 50 million accounts and that it's not yet clear whether any information was accessed or any accounts were otherwise misused.

The vulnerability that caused the breach was found Tuesday and was fixed on Thursday night, Facebook says. It was the result of bugs introduced into Facebook's code in July 2017. No passwords or credit card numbers were stolen, the company says.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET on Wednesday

Facebook became embroiled in another controversy Tuesday, after the American Civil Liberties Union accused the company of giving employers a powerful tool to discriminate against women seeking work.

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The Justice Department will meet with state attorneys generals this month as part of an investigation of whether social media companies are censoring conservative speech. 

This comes after President Trump and other prominent conservatives complained that companies, such as Facebook and Twitter, had unfairly removed or banned content. 

Today on Tech Tuesday, what that investigation could look like. 

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Old electrical, gas, and water meters are being replaced by smart meters. 

They’re quicker than traditional meters, using radio frequency signals to send meter readings back to the service provider.  

While 132,000 meters have already been installed this year in Ohio alone, not everyone’s thrilled. Homeowners in Illinois have already taken the meter companies to court, preferring traditional meter options. 

Today on Tech Tuesday, the future of smart meters. And, Russell Holly joins us again.

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Ahead of the midterm elections, Facebook and other social media platforms are cracking down on fraudulent users and groups that could be part of election meddling. 

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Facebook announced Tuesday afternoon that it has removed 32 Facebook and Instagram accounts or pages involved in a political influence campaign with links to the Russian government.

The company says the campaign included efforts to organize counterprotests on Aug. 10 to 12 for the white nationalist Unite The Right 2 rally planned in Washington that weekend.

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Congress isn’t the only government body looking into Facebook. Now a laundry list of federal agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice, are interested. 

When Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled on Capitol Hill last month, Sen. Lindsey Graham asked him whether his company faces any real competition: "If I buy a Ford, and it doesn't work well, and I don't like it, I can buy a Chevy. If I'm upset with Facebook, what's the equivalent product that I can go sign up for?"

After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress Tuesday and Wednesday, Facebook users — among many — are still wondering if online privacy still exists.

At the hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee Wednesday, Rep. Ben Luján (D-N.M.) asked Zuckerberg if Facebook had detailed profiles on even those who had never signed up for the social networking site.

He replied, "In general, we collect data of people who have not signed up for Facebook for security purposes."

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is appearing on Capitol Hill for a second day of hearings about protecting its users' data. Stream the hearing below, courtesy of PBS Newshour.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill to answer questions about protecting user data. Stream the hearing below, courtesy of PBS Newshour.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face Congress in two separate hearings this week, as his company grapples with intense scrutiny over privacy and security on the social media site. It will be Zuckerberg's first appearance on Capitol Hill.

On Tuesday afternoon, more than 40 senators will crowd into a hearing room, where members of the Senate judiciary and commerce committees will have four minutes each to question Zuckerberg. A similar scene will play out Wednesday, when he is set to appear before members of House Energy and Commerce Committee.

As the Facebook scandal over Cambridge Analytica's misuse of the personal data of millions of users continues to unfold, Facebook is suspending another data analytics firm over similar allegations.

According to reporting by CNBC, Cubeyou collected data from Facebook users through personality quizzes "for non-profit academic research" developed with Cambridge University — then sold the data to advertisers.

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A memo created by Facebook vice president Andrew Bosworth has added to the social media company's recent troubles. The memo states that Facebook should continue to grow and "connect people," even if users are harmed as a result. This comes days after it was reveled data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica, obtained personal data from millions of Facebook users without their consent.

We'll also look at the stories of women who made significant contributions to computer science, and the Internet as we know it today.

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