Environment

Erik Drost / Flickr

New funding from the state will help researchers better examine environmental problems in Lake Erie.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Walking through Creekside Park, tucked between downtown Gahanna and Big Walnut Creek, I just see a bunch of trees – at first.

Mark Urycki / ideastream

The Army Corps of Engineers is looking to protect its southern flank from invasive species. It’s putting up $2 million to stop the Asian carp and other species from getting any farther north than Akron.

Aleigha Sloan can't remember ever drinking a glass of water from the tap at her home.

That is "absolutely dangerous," the 17-year-old says, wrinkling her nose and making a face at the thought.

"You just don't touch that tap water unless absolutely necessary. I mean, like showers and things — you have to do what you have to do. But other than that, no," she says. "I don't know anybody that does."

PEXELS

New requirements aim to keep Ohioans safe from lead contamination in their drinking water.

A 600 mile long algae bloom on the Ohio River in 2015.
Jeff Reutter / Ohio Sea Grant via Flickr

A crowdsourcing effort is in the works to monitor toxic algae polluting Lake Erie.

Mike Hayes and I are sitting on the patio of Blue Bank Resort, the business he owns on Reelfoot Lake, in Tennessee. The sun is going down. It's beautiful.

What really catches your eye here is the cypress trees. They line the lake, and thousands of them are standing right in the water. Hayes tells me that they are more than 200 years old.

Kathleen Matthews

More than 100 community members crowded the Clark County Commissioners meeting Wednesday morning to protest a new limestone quarry in Springfield, Ohio.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Environmental advocates are pushing their support for Democrat Rich Cordray in his campaign for governor. They say that, between him and Republican Mike DeWine, Cordray is the one who will back environmental protections and support clean energy.

A glass of "Algae Bloom" beer at Maumee Bay Brewing Co. in Toledo. The brewery is making the green, murky beer to draw attention to the algae blooms that taint Lake Erie's water.
John Seewer / AP

There are spicy beers and even peanut butter beers, made to stand out on crowded shelves. Then there's a murky, green brew that looks a lot like algae. It's making a statement on the one ingredient brewers can't do without — clean water.

Environmental advocates say time is running out to save a federal fund that helps improve local parks, pools, and playgrounds. 

The vague warning jolted citizens in and around Salem, Oregon to attention on May 29.

"Civil Emergency in this area until 1128PM," read the text message alert. "Prepare for action."

It was a ham-handed message — one that left some wondering if an attack was imminent. In fact, the danger officials wanted to warn them about wasn't coming from the sky.

It was coming from their taps.

The Trump's administration's proposal to relax regulations on carbon emissions is welcome news in coal producing states like Wyoming, even as people in the industry acknowledge its impact would be limited.

Aerial Associates Photography, Inc. by Zachary Haslic / NOAA

Two Ohio lawmakers who criticized Gov. John Kasich's proposed farm regulations to combat Lake Erie's harmful algae blooms will lead a panel of legislators studying the lake's long-term health.

The bike & hike trail outside Akron was one of the first rail to trails in the country (
Mark Urycki / Ideastream

In June, Ohio’s General Assembly designated 2018 as “The Year of the Trail.” Now that may sound like National Donut Day, but in this case the Ohio Department of Natural Resources is doing something about it.

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