energy

WMFD/Screenshot by WOSU

The $4.2 billion Rover Pipeline cutting diagonally across Ohio is drawing more concern from state regulators. Last week, the Ohio EPA told the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that it is “deeply concerned” about a new spill from the Rover Pipeline.

Construction of the Rover Pipeline in Shelby, Ohio.
Trayden Schumacher / YouTube

The final say on building interstate pipelines, like the controversial NEXUS and Rover natural gas lines across northern Ohio, rests with FERC—the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.  And its newly appointed chairman has come on board saying it’s time to review the agency’s pipeline policies.

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The federal tax overhaul passed in December by Congress is raising questions about how changes may affect Ohio’s the energy industry.

An issue that some believe will reignite the wind energy industry is getting a new wave of support. A previous version of the bill stalled after the resignation of a senator. 

Ohio EPA

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is planning this week to issue new notices of violations against the company building the 700-mile Rover Pipeline across the state.  

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

TransCanada, the company that owns and operates the Keystone Pipeline, says that an estimated 210,000 gallons, or 5,000 barrels, of oil have spilled near the small town of Amherst, S.D.

Matthew Richmond / ideastream

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is suing the Rover Pipeline, accusing it of “a series of calculated business decisions or complete indifference” that led to millions of gallons of drilling fluids and other pollution being dumped into Ohio waterways and wetlands. 

The Wind Energy industry has been taking off in the Midwest. The number of wind farms in the region has doubled since 2011. In Ohio though, new development worth up to 1.6 billion dollars has stalled because of the debate over set-back rules, the guidelines that govern the distance between wind farms and property.

Trains carrying volatile crude oil across Ohio to East Coast refineries and ports in the U.S. and Canada will no longer include a kind of tanker cars that have proven to be easily ruptured in accidents.  

Four years ago, after several incidents of older-style tank cars bursting into flames in derailments, the federal government ordered them phased out by Jan. 1, 2018.  As that date nears, a Transportation Department report shows fewer than 300 of the cars are still in service.

Simon Fraser University

Larry Hecht runs Pier-48, an intermodal terminal on the Ohio River for loading and off-loading barges. At the height of the shale boom, it got 25 bulk shipments of drilling supplies like barite a month.

Then came the bust, and that traffic stopped.

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