drug prices

No on Issue 2 Campaign Manager Curt Steiner (left) and Yes on Issue 2 spokesperson Dennis Willard (right) speak Tuesday night after Issue 2 was strongly defeated by Ohio voters.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The debate over Issue 2 stirred a fight over the rising cost of drug prices and if the proposal would actually bring those prices down. It was a fight that ultimately became the most expensive ballot campaign in Ohio history. But all of that money and debate will not bring any significant change for the drug industry.

Lawmakers in the nation's capital have yet to grapple with rising drug costs. But in Ohio, voters are being asked by a ballot initiative to consider making a law that would require the state to pay no more for prescription drugs than the federal Department of Veterans Affairs does.

The Drug Price Relief Act, better known as Ohio Issue 2, has been promoted and pilloried in a dizzying crush of robocalls, direct mail and ads on TV and radio.

Google Creative Commons

Drug companies who’ve spent millions of dollars fighting a November ballot issue have made it the most expensive in Ohio history.

medicine
Pixabay

The state budget office says its required analysis of Issue 2 shows Ohio could save money if voters approve the drug price initiative next month. But the report says there are many variables that make it impossible to predict how much the state would save.

Former U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich hits the campaign trail to support drug price ballot Issue 2.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Former Democratic Congressman Dennis Kucinich will be starring in ads and on the campaign trail in support of the drug-price ballot question known as Issue 2. But his presence isn’t the only new element to the campaign.

Rory Rennick performs street magic in downtown Columbus. He said  he is using the tricks to show the tactics of Issue 2 Opponents.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Two sides are battling over an issue on this fall’s ballot that attempts to lower the costs of prescription drugs. As expected big drug companies have landed right in the middle of the fight. But exactly who is funding that side remains a big question mark.

Pills
Flickr.com / Flickr

The man behind a fall ballot initiative in Ohio aimed at trimming the prices government pays for prescription drugs is challenging any pharmaceutical industry CEO to debate him on the measure.

medicine
Pixabay

The November election is about 50 days away, with no major statewide candidates this year. That leaves room for both sides of a controversial drug price issue on the ballot to hit the airwaves with millions of dollars in ads. 

Healthcare Costs / Flickr Creative Commons

The ballot language for issues voters will see during this November’s election has been finalized. One side is making sure to highlight a certain section of the language.

prescription medicine bottles
David Kessler / Flickr Creative Commons

Supporters of the November ballot issue expected to be the most expensive in Ohio history are trying to get opponents of the measure to release details on their finances.

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