drug addiction

Ohio is among one of the hardest hit states by the opioid crisis. Yet, for five years in a row, Ohio along with every state in the U.S. has seen a continuous drop in opioid prescriptions.  Still the number of people who die from opioid overdoses continues to climb. This is all part of a national trend captured in a recent report from the American Medical Association.

Ohio Opioid Education Alliance

The Franklin County Opiate Action Plan announced a multi-million dollar effort to prevent youth drug abuse through awareness today. Dubbed the Ohio Opioid Education Alliance, it’s launched an ad campaign urging parents to not live in the fictional city of "Denial, Ohio."

More than 115 Americans are dying every day from an opioid overdose. But a study out Monday finds that just three in 10 patients revived by an EMT or in an emergency room received the follow-up medication known to avoid another life-threatening event.

Ohio U.S. Senator Rob Portman
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

A measure to crackdown on the shipment of opioids from China is moving its way through Congress. That's according to Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman who touts this provision as a key tool in the fight against the drug epidemic.

Jenn Glaser lay in bed with a severe pain in her right hip. In the last few days a large abscess had developed under her skin--an infection from injecting drugs. 

Amanda Williammee pauses at the window of the toddler classroom at Horizons day care in Carrboro, N.C., to quietly check on her 2-year-old daughter Taycee.

"I like to peek in on her and see what she's doing before she sees me," Williammee says. "I love watching her — it's too funny."

There's a dance party in progress. Soon, Taycee spots her mom, screams and comes running to the door.

"Did you dance?" Williammee asks, leaning down to her daughter.

To the untrained, the evidence looks promising for a new medical device to ease opioid withdrawal. A small study shows that people feel better when the device, an electronic nerve stimulator called the Bridge, is placed behind their ear.

The company that markets the Bridge is using the study results to promote its use to anyone who will listen: policymakers, criminal justice officials and health care providers.

The message is working.

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Sen. Sherrod Brown has introduced legislation to address what he says is a growing problem for employers and for people getting treatment for addiction.

David C. Barnett / ideastream

In December 2016, a man walked into the Willloughby-Eastlake Public Library and collapsed.

Medical marijuana appears to have put a dent in the opioid abuse epidemic, according to two studies published Monday.

The research suggests that some people turn to marijuana as a way to treat their pain, and by so doing, avoid more dangerous addictive drugs. The findings are the latest to lend support to the idea that some people are willing to substitute marijuana for opioids and other prescription drugs.

Pages