donald trump

Eisenhower and McCarthy

May 19, 2017
Major General Dwight Eisenhower
Imperial War Museum / Wikipedia Commons

The division between the two major political parties often takes away from the internal conflicts within the those parties.

Between 1953 and 1954, his first two years in office, Republican President Dwight Eisenhower came under the scrutiny of Sen. Joseph McCarthy who had already begun his campaign against those in office he believed were tied to the Communist Party.

Join us today as we speak with author David Nichols about the internal party conflict between President Dwight Eisenhower and Sen. Joseph McCarthy, and the parallels between McCarthy's politics and Trump's rhetoric.

At a Senate hearing Thursday, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, accused Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin of failing to answer his questions about President Trump's business ties to people who might be violating money laundering and other U.S. laws.

Mnuchin responded by suggesting Brown "just send me a note on what you are looking for."

Brown pointed out that he had already sent a two-page letter.

Ohio's Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown says he is not joining those who are calling for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

In a conference call with reporters today, he said “not many” of his colleagues are calling for impeachment. However, he did say there is concern on Capitol Hill about possible Russian ties with the president’s family, businesses and campaign.

Sen. Brown says he just wants to get to the bottom of the situation.

The elephant in the room whenever talking about President Trump and the Russia investigation is the big I-word — impeachment.

The word had been in the not-so-far reaches of liberal conspiracy talk since Trump was elected. There is a website with more than 976,000 signatures on a petition encouraging Congress to impeach Trump. There is even an "Impeach Donald Trump" Twitter handle.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Governor John Kasich says stories swirling around the White House show why he could not support the Trump campaign for president.

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

President Trump revealed "highly classified information" to two top Russian officials during a controversial Oval Office meeting last week, according to a report from The Washington Post.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

May 15, 2017
Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio has ruled that the ECOT online charter school must return $60 million of state funding. The state has argued that the Ohio’s largest e-school had no proof of how much time students were learning. ECOT is disputing that determination by the Ohio Department of Education.

The Republican health care bill passed by the House faces declining support. This is partially due to the fact that a percentage of voters believe the bill will fail to improve the health care system, and some voters are are now in favor of the 2010 Affordable Care Act.  

Join us today as we discuss ECOT’s ongoing fight with the state, health care and Ohio's budget bill.

In a letter released Friday, President Trump's lawyers said a decade's worth of his tax returns show that he doesn't owe money to Russian lenders and that he has received no income from Russian sources, "with a few exceptions."

The exceptions include this: "In 2008, Trump Properties LLC sold an estate in Florida, that it had acquired in 2005 for approximately $41 million, to a Russian billionaire for $95 million."

Updated at 11:00 p.m. ET

For months, Democrats in Congress have criticized and questioned FBI Director James Comey about his handling of last year's investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server.

Still, they've met President Trump's surprising Tuesday evening decision to fire Comey with near-universal outrage.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

A 13-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit heard arguments on Monday over President Trump's revised travel ban, with judges repeatedly questioning the government's lawyer in the case about Trump's campaign call "for a complete and total shutdown" of Muslims entering the country.

Rob Portman
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman acknowledges he was unsettled by President Donald Trump’s Tweet today calling for a “good” government shutdown. Portman says he’s trying to focus on the policies, not what he calls “the noise.”

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET.

With the clock ticking, Congress on Friday managed to fulfill its basic function — keeping the federal government running.

The House and Senate approved a short-term measure that funds the government for another week. Lawmakers voted hours ahead of a midnight deadline to avoid a partial shutdown of federal agencies.

Friday's extension gives members of Congress more time — until midnight on May 5 — to try to reach a deal on a spending bill that will last through the rest of fiscal year 2017, which ends Sept. 30.

President Trump still calls the North American Free Trade Agreement "a horrible deal" for the United States. But in opting to renegotiate — rather than cancel — the agreement, Trump acknowledged that backing out of NAFTA would be "a pretty big shock to the system."

After more than two decades, NAFTA is tightly woven into the economies of the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Trade among the three countries is much more robust and supply chains more tightly integrated than was the case in 1994 when NAFTA went into effect.

Even though President Trump calls the 100-days measure "ridiculous," the White House is still touting what one press release called the president's "historic accomplishments" — including 28 laws he has signed since taking office.

Eisenhower and McCarthy

Apr 27, 2017
Major General Dwight Eisenhower
Imperial War Museum / Wikipedia Commons

The division between the two major political parties often takes away from the internal conflicts within the those parties. Between 1953 and 1954, his first two years in office, Republican President Dwight Eisenhower came under the scrutiny of Sen. Joseph McCarthy who had already begun his campaign against those in office he believed were tied to the Communist Party.

Join us today as we speak with author David Nichols about the internal party conflict between President Dwight Eisenhower and Sen. Joseph McCarthy, and the parallels between McCarthy's politics and Trump's rhetoric.

Trump's First 100 Days

Apr 27, 2017
President Donald Trump
Sgt. Marianique Santos / U.S. Air Force

In his first 100 days, President Donald Trump made several promises including to begin building a wall on the Mexican border, remove the United States from several trade partnerships and repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

He has been able to follow through with some of his plans, like placing a conservative member on the Supreme Court, but many have been stalled or scaled back. Today we'll discuss Trump's first 100 days in office and how the rest of his presidency might shape up. 

North Korea

Apr 26, 2017
Stefan Krasowski / Flickr

Tensions between the United States and North Korea have been escalating for the past several weeks. Both China and the United States have been pressuring North Korea to halt its nuclear missile development, but Kim Jong-un has remained defiant as his regime continues to test ballistic missiles.

Every member of Congress has been called to the White House for a briefing on the situation in North Korea on Wednesday, and the House of Representatives is reported to be seeking a similar briefing. Today we take a look at the history of US foreign policy in North Korea and what to expect from the Trump Administration.

"I also protect myself by being flexible. I never get too attached to one deal or one approach."

Those words from Donald Trump's The Art of The Deal may be giving congressional Republicans some hope this week.

That's because Congress is facing a midnight Friday deadline to pass legislation to keep the federal government fully open — or face a partial government shutdown precisely on President Trump's 100th day in office.

Activists took to the streets in Washington, D.C., and several other cities Saturday — the traditional Tax Day (which officially falls on April 18 this year) — to try to pressure the president to release his tax returns. Liberal protests are fast becoming a fixture of Donald Trump's presidency.

Debbie Holmes

A trillion dollars for infrastructure? That's what President Trump is pushing for the United States, and Gahanna real estate developer Dan Slane is one of the people trying to figure out how that might happen. 

U.S. Missile Strike on Syria

Apr 11, 2017
President Donald Trump recieving a briefing about the Syrian chemical attack at Mar-a-Lago in West Palm Beach.
Shealah Craighead / The White House

President Donald Trump ordered a missile strike on Syria late last week in response to a chemical attack carried out against Syrian citizens. The move received mixed reactions from foreign policy analysts and government officials, and some fear the strike could have deeply damaged U.S. and Russian relations. Join us today as we discuss the consequences of this strike and what future U.S. policy regarding Syria might look like.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Apr 10, 2017
Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

President Donald Trump ordered a missile launch on Syria's government-controlled Shayrat air base in response to a chemical attack on Syrian citizens last week. This was the first American assault on Syria and Trump's most aggressive military action since he took office. Join us today to discuss the latest in state and national politics with a panel of reporters. 

President Trump issued a remarkable statement following a Syrian gas attack U.S. officials say was leveled by that country's leader against his own people.

Some 40 words of the short, 78-word statement blamed former President Barack Obama for inaction.

President Trump has donated his salary from his first few months in office to the National Park Service, making good on a campaign pledge to forego a presidential paycheck.

His gift represents a small fraction, however, of the money the Park Service stands to lose if Trump's budget were adopted.

Instead of collecting a salary of $400,000 a year, Trump has volunteered to donate that money to charity. He chose the Park Service as the beneficiary of his first installment, $78,333, which covers the first ten weeks Trump was in office.

With an oversized check for $78,333, written to the National Park Service, White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Monday took the first step in fulfilling President Trump's pledge to give away his presidential salary.

Spicer said that the sum equaled Trump's salary for the first quarter of 2017, and that similar charitable contributions will be made each quarter.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Nearly two dozen representatives of Ohio’s Tea Party have written a letter to President Donald Trump, chiding Trump for tweeting out a threat directed at the House Freedom Caucus after the GOP healthcare bill collapsed last week.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Mar 31, 2017
President Donald Trump announcing Judge Neil Gorsuch as his Supreme Court nominee at the White House on January 31st, 2017.
White House Official Photographer / Wikipedia Commons

As Judge Neil Gorsuch's confirmation vote for Supreme Court draws closer, it's becoming apparent that Democrats are prepared to filibuster. If he does not get the 60 votes needed to clear the Senate, Republicans could invoke the "nuclear option" and create a rule change that would allow Gorsuch to be confirmed with just a simple majority. Join us as we discuss this and the latest in political news with Ken Rudin. 

Guest:

More than 40 senators have signed a letter to President Donald Trump asking him to rescind his executive order promising to repeal the Affordable Care Act.  In exchange, the senators offer to work with the Trump administration to amend the healthcare act. Ohio Democrat Sherrod Brown is among the group of senators.


The Future of the GOP

Mar 29, 2017
House Speaker Paul Ryan meets with the President and Vice Presidents-elect, Donald Trump and Gov. Mike Pence on Capitol Hill on Nov. 10, 2016.
Caleb Smith / Wikimedia Commons

After failing to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, Republicans are contending with fractures in their party despite having majorities in the House and Senate and control of the White House. Today we'll discuss the future of the GOP and whether or not they will be able to unite under President Donald Trump.

Guests:

A new poll finds that President Trump's performance since taking office has done little to change the minds of Ohio voters.  

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