Activists across the country say they are being targeted by federal immigration authorities for speaking out at protests and accusing the government of heavy-handed tactics.

The Trump administration has warned that anyone in the country illegally could be arrested and deported under tough new enforcement rules. And federal officials deny allegations of retaliation.

But the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups say they have documented two dozen cases of immigrant activists and volunteers who say they have been arrested or face fines for their work.

The issue of immigration reform may have been swept from the headlines in the past couple weeks, but it hasn’t left the minds of many immigrants.

Local immigration attorneys say they’ve been getting worried calls from clients ever since the President proposed eliminating some categories of family-based visas.

“Most immigration attorneys would tell you that they are seeing a trend of people worried,” said immigration lawyer Melissa Gawelek, “especially people who are living thousands of miles away from their loved ones.”

Updated at 5:27 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that immigrants, even those with permanent legal status and asylum seekers, do not have the right to periodic bond hearings.

Federal immigration officers will continue their practice of going into federal, state and local courthouses seeking to arrest undocumented immigrants, despite the objections of immigrant advocates and some judges, including the chief justice of California.

In a two-page policy directive signed by the deputy director of U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Thomas Homan, agents will take

In 2012, as Syria's internal unrest deepened into full-scale civil war, Syrians living in the U.S. were offered an opportunity: If they met certain conditions and paid the requisite fees, they could register for temporary protection from deportation — and avoid having to return to the violence that awaited them back home.

About a hundred people gathered in the park across from the West Side Market a few hours before President Trump's State of the Union.

Just hours before President Trump’s State of the Union called for big cuts in legal immigration and continuing crackdowns on undocumented immigrants, about a hundred people gathered across from Cleveland’s West Side Market to rally for immigrants and refugees.

The gathering included a phone call from a Youngstown businessman less than a day after his deportation to Jordan.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

The decades-long battle of Youngstown businessman Amer Adi to remain in the U.S. is coming to a close, leaving a trail of unanswered questions about his deportation case. In Youngstown, it’s left a lot of people feeling his loss is their loss.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Youngstown businessman Amer Othman Adi lost his final bid to remain in the country on Thursday, when immigration officials turned down a special request for a stay from the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. His family went to say goodbye at the private prison where he’s been held and emerged bewildered and angry. 

Rep. Tim Ryan / Facebook

Immigration officials have decided to deport a Youngstown businessman despite a request from the chair of the U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee that his case be re-reviewed and his deportation stayed.


A Youngstown businessman remains in prison and on a hunger strike eight days after his controversial arrest by immigration officials. A candlelight vigil for Amer Othman Adi is planned for Thursday night, and another protest Friday.