deportation

Rep. Tim Ryan / Facebook

In a surprise reversal, U.S. immigration officials took a Youngstown businessman into custody today, less than two weeks after granting him a temporary stay. The arrest was condemned by both a Northeast Ohio congressman and a prominent supporter of President Trump.

In a narrow alley just behind a busy Queens street, Hernán's kitchen makes more than 4,000 churros each day for street vendors to sell across New York City. From 3 a.m., hours before nearby shop owners unlock their front gates, the kitchen fills with the sound of churro batter beating against the sides of large industrial mixers.

The kneaded dough is shaped by a long dispenser that drops it into sizzling hot oil. The churros — long, striated doughnuts — are finished with a sprinkling of sugar and cinnamon and stacked high on baking trays by Hernán's wife.

Rep. Tim Ryan / Facebook

Youngstown entrepreneur and downtown business owner Amer Othman Adi, 57, is not leaving the country this weekend. Immigration authorities had ordered him deported because of questions about the legality of his entry into the United States 38 years ago.  

Jess Mador / WYSO

Miami University graduate student Maria Sanchez has been following the debate over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, but she says she tries not to let news and social media distract her from her studies.

While the Trump administration continues the federal government's already-massive deportation program, 11 cities and counties will be joining the list of jurisdictions providing legal defense for undocumented immigrants at risk of deportation.

The detention of a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy in South Texas last month for immigration violations spotlights a harsh reality of the borderlands. Undocumented immigrants who live north of the border, but south of a string of Border Patrol checkpoints, say they feel trapped. They fear seeking specialized medical care or visiting family. Some call it la jaula, which is Spanish for "the cage"; others call it la isla, "the island."

Elizabeth Brown

On Monday, Columbus City Council voted to provide $185,000 to the Columbus Families Together Fund, aimed at supporting immigrants facing deportation. Council members say the goal is to prevent the separation of Central Ohio families if one or more members are living in the U.S. without proper residential status.

Amid the Trump administration's efforts to arrest people living in the country illegally, the Department of Homeland Security is looking at locations for five new detention centers around the country that could hold thousands of detainees.

Three churches in Ohio are among the dozens nationwide who are openly providing sanctuary to undocumented immigrants who face deportation. This weekend, the Beacon Journal’s Doug Livingston profiled two of those churches – one in Akron and one in Cleveland Heights. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze spoke with Livingston about the sanctuary church movement and the differences between it and higher profile – and more controversial -- “sanctuary cities.”

Ohio Interfaith Immigrant and Migrant Justice Coalition / Facebook

Edith Espinal, the first undocumented immigrant offered sanctuary by a church in Columbus, was scheduled to depart on Tuesday for Mexico, her country of origin. Instead, Espinal decided to remain in the U.S. and is asking that Ohio leaders visit and hear her story.

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