Dennis Kucinich

Haraz N. Ghanbari / Associated Press

It's a special edition of Snollygoster, Ohio's political podcast from WOSU Public Media, as hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown recap the state's primary election results. This was a jam-packed, but not particularly surprising, night, as voters decided candidates for governor, U.S. Senate, U.S. House, treasurer and too many more to count.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray shakes hands with supporters during an election night event Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Columbus.
Jay LaPrete / AP

Former Ohio Attorney General and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Chief Rich Cordray will be running as the Democratic gubernatorial candidate in November after winning last night’s primary. His victory was resounding.

Gabe Rosenberg

Former Consumer Financial Bureau director Richard Cordray has won the Democratic primary for Ohio governor.

Associated Press

Boxes of campaign literature clutter the floors and signs cover the walls of Cordray’s Columbus office. All of this, and a sign inviting volunteers to enjoy campaign snacks, serves as a testament to long hours spent on outreach efforts there.

Rich Cordray steps into the Laborers Local 574 hall in central Ohio. The hall is small – a dot of blue voters in the sea of red that is rural Ohio. Cordray was expected to be the unbeatable candidate in Tuesday's Ohio Democratic gubernatorial primary.

The former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has name recognition and Democratic street cred for once being dissed by President Trump.

Dennis Kucinich and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Less than a week before Election Day, four in 10 Democratic voters remain uncertain who they want to be their nominee for governor. The latest Baldwin Wallace University poll also shows the Republican side a lot more consolidated.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Snollygoster is the new Ohio politics podcast from WOSU Public Media. Every week, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown dive into the week’s biggest stories in Columbus and around the state.

Dennis Kucinich and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Next Tuesday's race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination between Richard Cordray and Dennis Kucinich has the potential to keep a lot of Ohio Democrats up until the wee hours of the morning.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich is returning a $20,000 speaking fee he received last year from a group sympathetic to Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

The Democratic and Republican candidates for governor have filed their final fundraising reports before the May primary. And Republican Mike DeWine is far out in front.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

O.K., Ohio gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich, you may have your hands full explaining this to Democratic primary voters.

Associated Press

The Democrats running for Ohio governor made closing pitches to Northeast Ohioans on Saturday, debating before a standing-room crowd of about 200 in Cleveland Heights.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Apr 23, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich is facing staunch criticism for accepting payments for speeches he had delivered to sympathizers of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Kucinich has refused to condemn Assad for allegedly launching chemical attacks against his own people, and has criticized American missile strikes on Syrian military bases.

We'll also look at the GOP race for governor, payday lending, and more with our panel of reporters.

Former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich speaks during a news conference announcing his run for Ohio governor, Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018.
Tony Dejak / AP

Snollygoster is the new Ohio politics podcast from WOSU Public Media. Every week, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown dive into the week’s biggest stories in Columbus and around the state.

This week, Democratic candidate for governor Dennis Kucinich is under fire for accepting $20,000 to speak at a conference hosted by a group supporting the regime of Syrian despot Bashar al-Assad. And yet Republicans are still giving Democrats a run for their money when it comes to negative campaigns.

Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland denounced Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich for accepting $20,000 to give a speech to a group that supports Syrian president Bashar Assad. 

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