Monday was supposed to be the day that DACA ended.

But court rulings have blocked President Trump from phasing out the program, at least for now, and negotiations have stalled out in Congress. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects undocumented immigrants brought to the country as children from deportation.

Updated at 3:44 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed the Trump administration a setback over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

The court declined to take up a key case dealing with the Obama-era DACA — for now.

The high court said an appeals court should hear the case first. The result is DACA will stay in place until or if the Supreme Court takes it up.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

The Senate failed to pass any immigration legislation before a self-imposed Friday deadline, leaving lawmakers with no plan to address the roughly 700,000 immigrants who stand to lose legal protections as early as March 5.

The defeat follows a rocky 24 hours of negotiations on a bipartisan bill that failed following a veto threat from President Trump. By a 39-60 vote, senators rejected a White House-backed plan that became a partisan lightning rod after Trump insisted his plan was the only one he would sign.

Immigration Debate Grips Congress

Feb 15, 2018
Protesters in San Francisco, September 5, 2017.
Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has launched a bipartisan debate regarding immigration reform. A path to citizenship for immigrants brought to U.S. by their parents as children, and a southern border wall are among the top policy issues at play. President Trump has already stated he won't sign any bill that doesn't meet of all his demands. 

We'll talk about the status of the debate and the future of immigration policy.

A federal judge in New York has ruled that the Trump administration cannot end the Obama-era program designed to protect from deportation young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Feb 8, 2018
L Allen Brewer / Flickr

On Wednesday, Senate leaders reached a spending deal that would add billions of dollars to defense and domestics programs.

The deal now goes to the House of Representatives, where Democrats will demand action on the Deferred Action Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA. They have until Thursday night to approve the budget and avoid another government shutdown.

We take a look at these issues and more with the Political Junkie, Ken Rudin. 

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

The House passed a bill Tuesday evening to avert a government shutdown on Thursday, as Senate leaders still hope to clear the way for years of budget harmony this week with a long-term spending agreement.

But as Congress worked on keeping things running, President Trump made a fresh call to shut down the government over immigration.

With another government shutdown looming this week, Senate Democrats, including Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown, are still hoping to strike a deal on protections for the undocumented immigrants known as "Dreamers." But at a news conference Monday, Brown suggested that failure to reach an agreement on the issue is "unlikely" to result in another shutdown.

President Trump's State of the Union

Jan 31, 2018
Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith / Joint Chiefs of Staff

Last night, President Trump gave his first State of the Union address. We'll take a look at what the administration has accomplished in its first year and the President's vision for the future. 

Of the 690,000 undocumented immigrants now facing an uncertain future as Congress and President Trump wrangle over the DACA program are about 8,800 school teachers.

The real possibility that they'll be deported if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is allowed to expire has put enormous stress on them.