Curious Cbus

You've got questions. We've got reporters. Let's find answers together.

That's the idea behind Curious Cbus. You submit your burning questions about our region and we’ll work on getting answers, together, through the resources of 89.7 NPR News, WOSU TV, and the WOSU Digital Media teams.

Here's the process:

  1. You submit a question
  2. You vote for your favorite question
  3. We report the story, together

So what are you curious about? Submit your question, vote on what we should investigate next, and see what we've dug up so far.

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Rager Photographic Company / Columbus Library

As part of our Curious Cbus series, WOSU collects questions from listeners and investigates the answers. But since the project started, a lot of the questions we've received have centered around various Columbus streets and where their names came from.

Besnson Kua, Derek Jensen / flickr & wikimedia

WOSU has been very busy in the past couple weeks with our Curious Cbus project, where you ask the questions and we investigate the answer. We've reported on the end of the "Clintonville Kangaroo" saga and learned why there is an abandoned highway overpass downtown.

All of those stories are thanks to questions from you.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Welcome home, “Kangaroo Crossing” sign.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

On the west side of Scioto Audubon Metro Park in downtown Columbus, people mount climbing walls, play on beach volleyball courts and ride down bike paths.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

More than two months after the city of Columbus removed Clintonville’s “Kangaroo Crossing” sign, the neighborhood will return it to its rightful home. Or, at least, right down the street.

J.W. Winder / Library of Congress

This story is part of the Curious Cbus project. You ask the questions, you vote for one of the questions and we answer.

The Catholic Diocese of Columbus just celebrated its 150th birthday in March. Inspired by a Curious Cbus question from David Patrick, we decided to delve into the history of Catholicism in Columbus.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Where once stood a bright yellow “Kangaroo Crossing” sign on Clinton Heights Ave., two smaller yard signs now mark its place: “Never Forget.”

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Residents of Clintonville are outraged. The reason? Their beloved “Kangaroo Crossing” sign is gone.

Deepti Hossain / WOSU

Haley Vest used to live on the corner of Indianola and Morse Road in Clintonville. But she would occasionally explore other areas—like the picturesque Old Beechwold neighborhood.

Godman Guild

This story is part of the Curious Cbus project. You ask the questions, you vote for one of the questions and we answer.

At the turn of the 20th century, thousands of migrants were arriving into Columbus by the railroad, greeted by the arches of Union Station. Poor, and with few connections in the city, these migrants didn’t stray far.

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