Criminal Justice

Nick Castele / ideastream

A Cleveland judge is welcoming the announcement that U.S. Marshals will conduct an independent assessment of conditions at the Cuyahoga County jail after six inmates died in the last three months.

Union County Sheriff's Office

A corn field, a stolen vehicle and a midnight car chase - that was the recipe leading to the capture of escaped inmate Cody Ray on Tuesday night.

Union County Sheriff's Office

The search continues for two men who escaped from a jail in Union County over the weekend.

The Union County Sheriff's Office says Joshua Hammond and Cody Ray ran through an open door and climbed a 12-foot fence Saturday at the West Central Community Correctional Facility on state Route 4 north of Marysville.

Dan Keck / Flickr

Sometimes an incident is different than what it appears. Take this case, as described by Upper Arlington Criminal Justice Program administrator Joe Roush.

The hit podcast Serial has turned its attention to Cleveland's Justice Center for its third season.  The first two episodes, about the case of a young woman charged with hitting a police officer in a bar fight and a judge who belittles and chastizes the defendants who come before him, have already cast a harsh light on the proceedings there.  A local attorney, Rebecca Maurer, is providing a counternarrative and context for the podcast through her blog, SerialLand.  

DAN KONIK / Statehouse News Bureau

Staff complacency, supervision problems, and outdated security policies and orders are among problems identified at Ohio's highest-security prisons following an attack on a correctional officer earlier this year that landed the officer in the hospital for weeks with multiple stab wounds, according to a report.

While a new report calls the state's cash bail system "unfair" to poor defendants, both the Ohio Bail Agents Association and the ACLU of Ohio disagree with a plan to reform the system – for very different reasons.

Wikimedia Commons

A state lawmaker says the way bail is set for people who are arrested can sometimes be a backwards process. He proposes a way to overhaul the system and base it on risk rather than resources.

Flickr

After Reuters published footage from 22 incidents in four U.S. jails, watchdogs at the United Nations are urging U.S. authorities to investigate criminal charges against jail officials in Ohio and three other states for torture. 

HDR Inc.

Franklin County’s jails are overcrowded and old. The downtown jail is 46 years old, and the jail on Jackson Pike is 31 years old. Neither functions properly for today's needs, jail officials say.

A new facility would replace both jails, and change how the county approaches inmate-guard interactions.

California Department of Corrections

While Wired Magazine is calling coding "the next big blue-collar job," Ohio may be creating a barrier between that industry and the people who could benefit most from employment.

Ohio Prison Oversight

Apr 14, 2017
Neil Conway / Flickr

The Correctional Institution Inspection Committee, which oversees prison operations in Ohio, will soon likely be closed with its workload shifted to the inspector general's office. The committee was established in 1977 to provide legislative oversight to the state’s prison system, and last year its director was forced to resign under pressure. Today we'll take a look at what this means for the future of Ohio prison oversight with a panel of guests.

Ohio Prison Oversight

Mar 23, 2017
prison bars
Neil Conway / Flickr

The Correctional Institution Inspection Committee, which oversees prison operations in Ohio, will soon likely be closed with its workload shifted to the inspector general's office. The committee was established in 1977 to provide legislative oversight to the state’s prison system, and last year its director was forced to resign under pressure. Today we'll take a look at what this means for the future of Ohio prison oversight with a panel of guests.

A state panel is recommending changes to Ohio court practices that often keep defendants in jail because they can't afford bail. 

The city of Columbus and a group that works to free wrongly convicted people ended a years-long fight this week. 

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