Congress

Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET

So, here we go again.

The federal government is once more on the verge of a shutdown, and just like the last time, in October 2013, there will some things you'll notice that are shuttered and others you won't.

Ohio U.S. Sentators Rob Portman, left, and Sherrod Brown.
Ideastream

Both of Ohio’s Senators want to meet a Friday deadline to avoid a partial government shutdown.

Members of Congress are working on a short-term funding bill to keep the federal government open, but are still debating the inclusion of some controversial measures that likely won’t make the final resolution – like fixes for insolvent workers’ pensions and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA.

President Trump and congressional Democrats appear no closer to a deal on protecting "Dreamers" from deportation, but GOP lawmakers are working on a Plan B that would — if approved — prevent an election-year shutdown of the government, extending funding at least another month.

A continuing resolution is due to expire this Friday, but Republicans have proposed kicking the can down the road once more with an extension on stop-gap funding through Feb. 16.

The Future of Federal CHIP Funding

Jan 16, 2018
Val Gempis, U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

Congress allowed funding for the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to lapse in 2017, leaving an estimated 220,000 Ohio children at risk of losing their health coverage as soon as January 19.

We'll discuss what is causing the unusual delay in appropriating funds for the program and how CHIP families may be impacted in 2018.

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., announced he will not seek re-election Wednesday, adding to a record number of House Republicans heading for the exits ahead of the 2018 midterms — perhaps seeing the writing on the wall of a possible wave election for Democrats.

There are now 31 Republicans who will not seek re-election in November: 19 who are retiring outright and another 12 who are running for higher office. And that list is is expected to grow in the coming weeks.

Steve Chabot / Facebook

This may sound like crazy talk, but there are some out there in Democratic circles – both here and in Washington – who believe Ohio's 1st Congressional District will be in play in 2018.

If you're like most Americans, you don't have a 529 college savings plan.

If you're like most Americans, you don't even know what it is.

All the more reason to keep reading.

That's because, with the new tax law, Republicans have made important changes to 529 plans that will affect millions of taxpayers, not just the ones saving for college. Before that news, though, a quick primer.

The DREAM Act has failed to pass when Democrats have held complete control of government; when Republicans have held all the cards; and in periods when the two parties have split control of the White House, Senate and House.

But lawmakers from both parties hope to secure permanent legal status for people protected by the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals , or DACA, program and they are trying to achieve some sort of solution over the next two weeks.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

As the year comes to a close, candidates are already lining up for next year’s Congressional races – with the seats of both U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi and U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci up for grabs.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

It was a chilly winter day in North Akron, just a few blocks from the Sand Run Metro Park. Out in a straight line, heading just 4 miles southwest from this spot, you could travel through all four of Summit County’s Congressional districts.

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