Common Cause Ohio

Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

It’s highly likely Ohio voters will get to vote on a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional districts map in May. The House approved a plan Tuesday that passed the Senate unanimously the night before.

The passage comes in time for lawmakers to make the February 7 deadline for putting the issue before voters in May.

Fair Districts Ohio / Facebook

Closed-door negotiations over a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional map have broken down. Ohio lawmakers and representatives from citizens’ groups left the Statehouse late Wednesday night without coming to an agreement.

Karen Kasler / Statehouse Bureau

A coalition of citizens groups had been talking with state lawmakers about a compromise to change the way Ohio’s Congressional map is redrawn.

After just a few days, both sides now say efforts to reach a deal have failed.

Fair Districts Ohio / Facebook

Supporters of a redistricting plan that might be on the November ballot are critical of a Republican bill being considered by Ohio lawmakers that would let them retain control over the process of drawing Congressional district lines.

Fair Districts Ohio / Facebook

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

“It’s like Christmas,” Turcer said. “I got the best present, and the thing that’s exciting is that this is for all of us.”

Marsy's Law For Ohio / Facebook

If Issue 2 had passed on Tuesday night, it would have been only the fourth time in Ohio history that a law brought to the ballot by an individual or a group was approved by voters. There’s a new effort to make changes in that process.

Ohio Congressional Map for 113th Congress
U.S. Geological Survey

State legislative leaders have formed a four-member bipartisan group to work on creating a new way to redraw Ohio’s Congressional district map, which will be redone after the 2020 census. But supporters of an effort already underway to change the map drawing process aren’t backing down.

Andy Chow

The groups working on a constitutional amendment to change the way Congressional districts are created in Ohio will spend this weekend managing a setback for their goal of a statewide vote on it.

Ohio Congressional Redistricting

May 2, 2017
Department of the Interior - National Atlas of the United States

A coalition of Ohio nonprofits has banded together to obtain the signatures necessary to get a ballot measure for congressional redistricting to be considered for approval for the the 2017 ballot. If approved, the measure would put redistricting into the hands of the seven-member Redistricting Commission. Many Ohio lawmakers have been attempting to address gerrymandering over the past several years, but no action has been taken by Ohio's Congress yet. Join us today as we discuss the possibility of redistricting reform in Ohio with a panel of guests.

Guests:

Two years after winning a reform of the way Statehouse lawmakers’ districts are drawn, advocates for congressional redistricting in Ohio have taken the first step to putting that issue before voters.

The League of Women Voters, Common Cause Ohio and the Ohio Environmental Council have collected 1,000 petition signatures to ask voters to change the way Congressional district maps are drawn.

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