Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Find concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features, and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

And check back frequently from June through August this year as we celebrate A Bernstein Summer. We're marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great composer, conductor and educator Leonard Bernstein with a series of local radio programs, podcasts, modules and blog posts.

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Simon & Schuster

I knew of Eugene Drucker as a formidable violinist, and as a member of the acclaimed Emerson String Quartet. The Emersons have been established internationally for years. And they've long had a home on Classical 101.

color photo of matthew Burtner looking at a large score
matthewburtner.com

Composer and sound artist Matthew Burtner says he understands the sound of snow.

“Growing up in Alaska, the sound of snow is what really got me into computer music,” said Burtner —professor of composition and computer technologies and chair of the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia — in a recent phone interview. “I just understand the sound of snow really well, and I’ve used it in my music for a long time.”

Two poets and a composer walk into a radio studio. Nope, not the setup for a silly joke — but instead for an intriguing conversation among local artists about creating art.

Monday afternoon Columbus composer Jacob Reed and Thomas Worthington High School student poet Nat Hickman joined me in the Classical 101 studios for a conversation about writing poetry and music inspired by poetry.

Paola Kudacki / Metropolitan Opera

The Metropolitan Opera presents a new production of Jules Massenet's Cendrillon, screened live in HD at movie theaters worldwide at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 28.

Arvo Pärt is one of the most popular, most performed living composers. He's beloved worldwide for his signature sound – a spacious, meditative music that tends to sound timeless.

But there's a lesser-known side to the 82-year-old Estonian's career. It's a story that can be traced in a new recording of Pärt's four Symphonies. The album is a musical journey spanning 45 years in fervently detailed performances by the NFM Wrocław Philharmonic, conducted by fellow Estonian Tõnu Kaljuste.

color photo of LancasterChorale singing in a concert in a church
facebook.com/lancaster-chorale

It happens early on in almost every creation story — the stars and the planets are made and set in motion, leaving us, throughout the eons, to look up at the sky and wonder how it all works.

It is the stuff of poetry and music. And this weekend, LancasterChorale will perform a program of works inspired by celestial bodies and other natural wonders.

Gregor Hohenberg / Sony Classical

There may be a phantom of the opera in literature, in the movies and on Broadway. But in recent years, tenor Jonas Kaufmann has risked being labeled the phantom tenor.

color photo of the facade of the Ohio Statehouse
Jim Bowen / Flickr

The alarming escalation of school shootings in recent years has left our nation grieving for innocent lives lost and desperate to bring the bloodshed to an end. A student-led group of Ohio musicians is aiming to help end school shootings — not with political rhetoric, not from the bully pulpit, but instead with a day full of beautiful music.

HarperCollins Publishers

Think of your favorite page-turner. Think of the novel you get lost in, whether on the beach or on the bus — "The Thorn Birds" by Colleen McCullough comes to mind for me.

Then add to that a dash of love for music and musicians, and you get Lauren Belfer's "And After the Fire."

jennifer koh holding her violin
Juergen Frank / jenniferkoh.com

The Columbus Symphony welcomes composer Andreia Pinto Correia this weekend for the world premiere of her Ciprés (Cypresses)a work for orchestra inspired by the poetry of Federico Garcia Lorca.

Following the premiere, violinist Jennifer Koh joins the symphony as the soloist for Jean Sibelius' Concerto in D Minor. The Columbus Symphony program closes with Hector Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique.

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