Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Find concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features, and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

And check back frequently from June through August this year as we celebrate A Bernstein Summer. We're marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great composer, conductor and educator Leonard Bernstein with a series of local radio programs, podcasts, modules and blog posts.

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Alessandro Siciliani, Conductor Laureate of the Columbus Symphony, grew up amongst Italy's great concert halls and opera houses. He shares his impressions of conductor Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957). Over a long career, Toscanini was Music Director of La Scala, Milan, the New York Philharmonic, and the NBC Symphony Orchestra. Toscanini's many recordings are well over sixty-years-old. Maestro Siciliani discusses his favorites among the vast Toscanini archive, and how the great conductor demanded perfection from everyone, especially during rehearsals.

Soprano Licia Albanese shares her memories of the great conductor Arturo Toscanini Mme Albanese sang Mimi in La Boheme and Violetta in La Traviata on Toscanini’s broadcasts with the NBC symphony in the 1940s. These recordings have never been out of print. She sang at the Metropolitan from 1940 to 1966 and continued her career for years afterward. Today, at 94, Albanese gives master classes for, and financial assistance to, young artists through the Licia Albanese Puccini Foundation.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about the fact that Ludwig van Beethoven hasn't changed: audiences have, and sometimes it's difficult to 'sell' classical composers to a live audience. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/MakingMusicinaModernWorld-Part2.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "I don't Beethoven has changed. I don't think Mahler has changed, or Shostakovitch has changed. I think it's the people who are listening to it have changed.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about composer Aaron Copland, whose famous compositions he wrote in the 1920s and 30s -- including Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid, Rodeo and Fanfare for the Common Man -- stand as the epitome of the American sound. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Aaron_Copland.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "Copeland really is the quintessential American sound.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how modern audiences are far different than those who listened to Ludwig Van Beethoven and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when the composers first performed their works. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/MakingMusicinaModernWorld-Part1.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "I'd love to do Mahler's Second (Symphony) once a month for our audiences.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Johann Sebastian Bach, whose fascination with numerology and theology led to extraordinarily complex music at times. Just how complex is too complex?

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Alexander Borodin's 2nd Symphony, with its unique, "funny" meters and pulses that - ultimately - work. Borodin was a medical teacher by profession, and his career interrupted his compositions such that his second symphony took about nine years to complete. Regarding Borodin's attempt to revise his score, Franz Liszt said

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Ludwig van Beethoven's 6th symphony, also known as the Pastoral Symphony, which, like his other even-numbered symphonies is underplayed and under-performed. Scharm, on the other hand, re-discovered its glory through the original instrumentation and tempi. Movements:

The Egos of Conductors

Dec 10, 2006

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about conductor's egos. Schram tells the tale of Igor Stravinsky conducting his own score, and how his ego led him astray. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/ConductorsEgos.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "The Symphony of Psalms (1930) by Stravinsky had just come out, and Rafael Kubelík studied the score, and he studied it. And he was going to perform it.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how orchestras sometimes need to tap into the inner child of adults, to get them on their feet and moving to dance music. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Dance.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "People laugh at Andre Rieu, but he stands up there, and has himself a good time, and wants people in the aisles dancing." Albert-George: "And he hooks into large audiences.

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