Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Find concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features, and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

And check back frequently from June through August this year as we celebrate A Bernstein Summer. We're marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great composer, conductor and educator Leonard Bernstein with a series of local radio programs, podcasts, modules and blog posts.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about composer Aaron Copland, whose famous compositions he wrote in the 1920s and 30s -- including Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid, Rodeo and Fanfare for the Common Man -- stand as the epitome of the American sound. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Aaron_Copland.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "Copeland really is the quintessential American sound.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how modern audiences are far different than those who listened to Ludwig Van Beethoven and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when the composers first performed their works. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/MakingMusicinaModernWorld-Part1.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "I'd love to do Mahler's Second (Symphony) once a month for our audiences.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Johann Sebastian Bach, whose fascination with numerology and theology led to extraordinarily complex music at times. Just how complex is too complex?

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Alexander Borodin's 2nd Symphony, with its unique, "funny" meters and pulses that - ultimately - work. Borodin was a medical teacher by profession, and his career interrupted his compositions such that his second symphony took about nine years to complete. Regarding Borodin's attempt to revise his score, Franz Liszt said

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Ludwig van Beethoven's 6th symphony, also known as the Pastoral Symphony, which, like his other even-numbered symphonies is underplayed and under-performed. Scharm, on the other hand, re-discovered its glory through the original instrumentation and tempi. Movements:

The Egos of Conductors

Dec 10, 2006

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about conductor's egos. Schram tells the tale of Igor Stravinsky conducting his own score, and how his ego led him astray. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/ConductorsEgos.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "The Symphony of Psalms (1930) by Stravinsky had just come out, and Rafael Kubelík studied the score, and he studied it. And he was going to perform it.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how orchestras sometimes need to tap into the inner child of adults, to get them on their feet and moving to dance music. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Dance.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "People laugh at Andre Rieu, but he stands up there, and has himself a good time, and wants people in the aisles dancing." Albert-George: "And he hooks into large audiences.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Igor Stravinsky's foray into jazz, the Ebony Concerto (1945) and Concerto in E-flat, a.k.a. Dumbarton Oaks (1937–38). Stravinsky felt that the jazz musicians would have a hard time with the various time signatures.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about the under-appreciated composer Louis Moreau Gottschalk, an American composer and pianist. He was born to a Jewish businessman from London and a Creole mother in New Orleans, where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue (1924), originally composed for solo piano and jazz band written in 1924. The composition was orchestrated by Ferde Grofé three times, in 1924, in 1926, and finally in 1942, who pushed the piece toward the more symphonic sound that is widely played today.

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