Classical 101

Classical 101 is the only classical music station in Central Ohio. The Classical 101 hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world. 

We also present a series of podcasts as well as archived audio from musicians who perform live in our studio

Conducting Small Gems

Oct 23, 2006

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about conducting small gems. These short pieces - as opposed to symphonies and operas - are featured heavily especially during pops performances, and tend to get dismissed from discussions about great music. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's waltz from Eugene Onegin is one such piece.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about finding the line between editing a composer's piece, and altering a piece. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Schumann2.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "When you approach a composer's score, like a Schumann, what does it take to walk that fine line between editing and cleaning up, and altering things to the point that maybe it gets away from the composer's intention?

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about new (and old) works that may prolong, or shorten, the lives of orchestras.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Richard Wagner, whose long, massive works makes some classical lovers to recoil. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Wagner.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "I'm sure you've conducted plenty of Wagner's music, and, of course, there are some real gems in almost all of Wagner's operas.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how such sad, profound text can carry with it cheerful music. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/SpeaktheAudiencesLanguage1.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "One of the very first pieces I conducted as a student was (Giovanni Battista) Pergolesi's Stabat Mater, and it's a beautiful piece.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how much easier and joyful it is when the symphony and audience can connect. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/SpeaktheAudiencesLanguage2.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "When the audience is drawn to the orchestra, and the orchestra and audience connect, there's a lot of electricity in the auditorium. It has to help you play." Albert-George: "Yes. I think it makes it more meaningful.

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