Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Find concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features, and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

And check back frequently from June through August this year as we celebrate A Bernstein Summer. We're marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great composer, conductor and educator Leonard Bernstein with a series of local radio programs, podcasts, modules and blog posts.

When Johann Sebastian Bach compiled the first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier in 1722, he wrote that the 24 preludes and fugues were "for the profit and use of musical youth desirous of learning, and especially for the pastime of those already skilled in this study."

color photo of composer Caroline Shaw
Kait Moreno / carolineshaw.com

During Women’s History Month, I continue my conversation with one of today’s most acclaimed women composers, Pulitzer Prize-winner Caroline Shaw.

In part 2 of my October 2017 interview with Shaw, we talk about some of the most significant influences — musical and otherwise — on her music, the state of new music today, why music by women composers remains underrepresented on concert programs and how to begin changing that tradition.

facebook.com/columbussymphony

The Columbus Symphony broadcast series returns to Classical 101 at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 1.

We're featuring the full line-up of 2017-18 Classical Series programs by the Columbus Symphony and guests, Sunday afternoons through June 24. Ed Thompson recorded the concerts in the Ohio and Southern theaters.

color photo of composer Caroline Shaw
Kait Moreno / carolineshaw.com

As the saying goes, everything has a price. Had the entry fee for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize competition in music been more than $50, Caroline Shaw might not have become the youngest person ever to win that coveted award.

color photo of REBEL Baroque musicians holding instruments
Howard Goodman / rebelbaroque.com

Last Friday afternoon, Classical 101 really did go for Baroque.

Our crew went to Capital University’s Mees Auditorium for a rehearsal of acclaimed ensemble REBEL Baroque and two of the world’s foremost Baroque dancers, Paige Whitley-Bauguess and Thomas Baird.

Wikimedia Commons

Maybe we have Antiques Roadshow to thank. Because of the cultural phenomenon of that PBS television show, many of us view anything found in an attic, basement or forgotten closet as a potential treasure. And now in the Digital Age, it’s easier than ever to quickly research and back up a hunch about the value of found items.

New finds and rediscoveries can even amend history as we know it. Composer Florence Price has been, in large part due to race and gender, a footnote in American musical history when she should have been a chapter. But an unlikely unearthing of Price papers has revived her story and brought to light music that was thought to be lost.

color photo of Maren Montalbano and Melissa Dunphy
melissadunphy.com

A young Norse woman dresses up as a man, sails to the distant island where her ancestors are buried and demands that her dead father hand over a powerful sword as her birthright.

No, it’s not a role-playing game. It’s Philadelphia-based composer Melissa Dunphy’s Hervararkviða​, or The Incantation of Hervor, a set of three songs for mezzo-soprano, violin and harp whose texts tell a story as unusual as the sound-world Dunphy’s score creates for it.

amazon.com / Oxford University Press

If you go through life with a name like John Latouche, you'd better be talented.

Luckily, John Treville Latouche (1914-1956) was immensely talented. He made his name as the go-to guy for witty, biting lyrics, inspiring Duke Ellington, Jerome Moross, Vernon Duke and Leonard Bernstein.

arpeggiata.com

Picture it: George Frideric Händel’s music played like jazz, complete with improv, riffs, sparkling syncopations and blisteringly virtuosic licks.

Sound outrageous? Not really, says Christina Pluhar, founder and director of early music ensemble L’arpeggiata.

Opera & Lyric Theatre / Ohio State University

Candide — a show with music by Leonard Bernstein, book by Lillian Hellman, lyrics by Richard Wilbur with help from John Latouche and Dorothy Parker, and based on Voltaire no less — opened on Broadway the night of Dec. 1, 1956.

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