Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Explore concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

Playlists | Program Schedule

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Igor Stravinsky's foray into jazz, the Ebony Concerto (1945) and Concerto in E-flat, a.k.a. Dumbarton Oaks (1937–38). Stravinsky felt that the jazz musicians would have a hard time with the various time signatures.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about the under-appreciated composer Louis Moreau Gottschalk, an American composer and pianist. He was born to a Jewish businessman from London and a Creole mother in New Orleans, where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue (1924), originally composed for solo piano and jazz band written in 1924. The composition was orchestrated by Ferde Grofé three times, in 1924, in 1926, and finally in 1942, who pushed the piece toward the more symphonic sound that is widely played today.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about John Williams, who left the Boston Pops and has become synonymous with George Lucas and Stephan Spielberg movies. But underneath those scores lies a composer for which Schram admires and would love to conduct more of.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Modest Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain. There are various versions of this piece, including Mussorgsky's seldom-performed 1867 version and a 1886 "fantasy for orchestra" arranged by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Like many of Mussorgsky's works, the piece was completed by another artist.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Franz Josef Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Their output was immense, their talents immense, but they both had obligations to fulfill - professional and personal. Would they have been even greater artists without these constraints?

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about making music that lasts. Schram confesses that what he thinks is profound music may not correspond to audiences' expectations, and that sometimes orchestras need to supply escapism.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about making music that lasts. Too often, Schram suggests, composers fall into traps when writing for violins or woodwinds, assigning them too-familiar roles that don't explore the boundaries of the possible, settling for the expected. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/MakingMusicthatLasts1.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "It's difficult to make a string section rock.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about how conductors need to wary of music that looks simple. Especially when Schram is faced with the music of Mozart or Haydn, he loves simplicity of their music, despite their reputations for writing complex scores, but always strives to show the orchestra where the beauty lies.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's 40th Symphony, a piece where Schram can hear Mozart's muse in every note. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Mozart-40.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "I love Mozart's muse, and I want everyone else to hear it the way I do.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, former staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about George Gershwin's enormous legacy. His influences were many: French music (Claude DeBussy and Maurice Ravel, especially), Russian composition teacher Joseph Schillinger, ballet, folk, gospel, blues, jazz, African syncopation, etc. From his hands, with the help of his brother Ira's lyrics, came a unique sound that never grows old.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about Robert Schumann, a great composer who needs a little 'help' from conductors to make his orchestra music sing. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Schumann1.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Albert-George: "There are great composers. There are composers who need help, a little bit. Moussorgsky's not as great as others. Schumann is another one that you have to help.

Conducting Small Gems

Oct 23, 2006

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about conducting small gems. These short pieces - as opposed to symphonies and operas - are featured heavily especially during pops performances, and tend to get dismissed from discussions about great music. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's waltz from Eugene Onegin is one such piece.

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about finding the line between editing a composer's piece, and altering a piece. [audio src="http://wosu.org/audio/classical/2006/Schumann2.mp3"] Highlights From This Interview: Boyce: "When you approach a composer's score, like a Schumann, what does it take to walk that fine line between editing and cleaning up, and altering things to the point that maybe it gets away from the composer's intention?

Boyce Lancaster talks with Maestro Albert-George Schram, the resident staff conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, about new (and old) works that may prolong, or shorten, the lives of orchestras.

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