Classical 101

Classical 101 is Central Ohio’s source for 'round-the-clock classical music. Our hosts provide insight into classical music news from Columbus and around the world.

Find concert previews, book and record reviews, arts features, and archived audio and video of local and visiting musicians. Listen your way through our podcast archives of Opera Abbreviated and the Mozart Minute for a deeper dive into the music we play.

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Highlands Presbyterian Church on Smoky Row Road is the home of a vibrant worship community augmented by a concert series.

Regina Fleming / morningsideopera.com

Harry Lawrence Freeman was arguably the most important African-American composer of opera working during the era of the Harlem Renaissance.

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Montserrat Caballe has died, and there are no more grand divas left.

Over two decades ago in 1997, when violinist Hilary Hahn was 17, she made a celebrated recording debut, Hilary Hahn Plays Bach. That year, Hahn told NPR about her enthusiasm for Bach's music.

"There's nothing I really wanted to record more than Bach," Hahn said. "I can work on it for a long time and keep discovering more things that surprise me every time."

Marty Sohl / Metropolitan Opera

The Metropolitan Opera's Live in HD presentations, beamed into cinemas worldwide, begins a new season Saturday, Oct. 6. Anna Netrebko stars in the title role of Giuseppe Verdi's Aida.

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Two years ago, I heard a recording made by a young, Cuban-born pianist now living in Columbus.

This weekend, a Columbus-based professional cello quartet will breathe new life into choral music originally composed for an art installation piece that explored the question of death.

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By the height of the Harlem Renaissance in the early 20th century, the tradition of arranging African-American spirituals for concert performance had strongly emerged.

Westerville Symphony / facebook.com/westervillesymphony

A man makes a deal with the devil and, for a time, thinks he has won.

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Home to Classical 101, WOSU Public Media also encompasses 89.7 NPR News, WOSU TV, WOSU Classroom and more.

We thought it would be fun to ask our WOSU coworkers to tell us about their favorite classical music works. It’s always exciting to see what door people find into the genre.

Two of the country's oldest and most venerated music institutions, the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera, are beginning their seasons with a change in artistic leadership. Both organizations are grappling with 21st century issues of bringing new audiences in and convincing them that centuries-old music forms are central to their lives today.

Despite being one of the first and oldest forms of popular music, opera sometimes struggles to connect with 21st century audiences. However, Anthony Roth Costanzo is breaking down the genre's stodgy stereotype and making opera more accessible — taking his distinctive sound to the masses, from a sixth-grade classroom in the Bronx to NPR's own Tiny Desk.

For many instrumentalists, the idea to "sing through your instrument" is just a figure of speech. But for Cleveland-based Ogni Suono saxophone duo, it's an actual way of life.

The New York Philharmonic announced Sunday that it has taken action against two prominent musicians over unspecified "misconduct": the orchestra's principal oboist, Liang Wang, and its associate principal trumpeter, Matthew Muckey.

The orchestra said the decision came after a five-month internal investigation, led by a former federal judge. Both musicians dispute the Philharmonic's findings, and while the musicians' union reviews the orchestra's decision, the two have been placed on unpaid leave.

Tenth Intervention / tenthintervention.com

Earlier today in the Classical 101 studios, madness reigned supreme.

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