Classical 101

Jessica Lewis / Pexels

Where did the year go? While December can really pile on the stress with winter weather, holiday preparations, work deadlines and family visits, it’s also the time for some of the most sublime, glorious music in the cycle of the year.

As 2017 draws to a close, the music of Chanukah and Christmas reminds so many of us of our treasured holiday traditions. 

We have a full slate of special programs scheduled to air on Classical 101 this month, in addition to holiday editions of our regular shows.

color photo of John Rittmeyer taking at the microphone
Jennifer Hambrick

The afternoon announcer with the warm voice and the calm, gentle demeanor — on and off the air — will be signing off from Classical 101 for good at the end of December.

Classical 101 afternoon host John Rittmeyer is retiring after more than 30 years at WOSU. The friendly voice you’ve heard at the end of your workday, during your evening commutes and while you settle into your evening at home has been a steady companion for thousands of listeners through the years.

interior of St. Joseph Cathedral
Columbus Landmarks

Bundle up, put on your walking shoes and get yourselves ready for a tour of four beautiful downtown Columbus churches and an afternoon of music in sacred spaces. 

The Great Hallelujah Holiday Tour is a great way for you to get in the holiday spirit and support Classical 101 at the same time.

Join Columbus Landmarks and your favorite Classical 101 hosts Saturday, Dec. 2 to hear seasonal music and learn about the architecture and history of some of the landmark churches along Broad Street.

The National Archives UK / Wikimedia Commons

While you've been putting the finishing touches on your Halloween costume, we've been working on special music for the holiday! The American Sound, Sunday Baroque and Essential Classics will feature spooktacular programming leading up to Oct. 31.

Musica Cubana, Classical 101's celebration of Cuban and Latino music, returns for a new season at 1 p.m. this Sunday, Oct. 1. Five new programs will air Sundays in October.

Musica Cubana features Columbus-based pianist Orlay Alonso as co-host, music director and muse. We'll hear music by Cuban-born composers Tania Leon, Leo Brouwer, Ignacio Cervantes, Gonzalo Roig, Jose Maria Vitier and Ernesto Lecuona.

black-and-white photo of Maria Callas singing
The Ed Sullivan Show / CBS

A few weeks ago during Opera and More, I was remembering soprano Roberta Peters, who died earlier this year. I said that Peters had been Ed Sullivan's most-featured guest, more than Louis Armstrong, Judy Garland or Topo Gigio, the Italian mouse.

I went on to say, "And if you don't know Ed Sullivan, call me up on the phone."

Quite a few listeners did call, including a lovely plethora of 20- and 30-somethings for whom Ed Sullivan was not even in the history books.

Recently I had the opportunity to observe music therapy classes at Columbus' Bridgeway Academy. Joining me for the visit were WOSU intern Sean Flynn and digital producer Emily Thompson.

In honor of National Autism Awareness Month, we created a series of posts and videos highlighting the work being done at Bridgeway, showing the positive effects music has on the lives and development of kids on the autism spectrum. This post is the last of three.

Socialization is an important goal for kids on the autism spectrum. The kind of connection to others that does not come naturally to them can be helped along, by music.

Boyce Lancaster

Today it’s time for a curtain call for someone who has performed her job exceedingly well, but who has scrupulously avoided the limelight. Most of the time, those of us on the air receive the compliments for what you hear, but we are only a part of what goes into your listening experience on Classical 101.

http://www.antoineclark.com

The wonderful Antoine Clark is a Columbus based clarinetist, teacher and conductor. Antoine recently took some time out of a ferociously busy schedule to help me with a series of podcasts on African-American conductors.

Mary Hoffman became program director of WOSU-FM in 1966. Before her retirement thirty years later, Mary interviewed at length some of the greatest musicians of the 20th century.

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