Cincinnati police

taser
U.S. Air Force photo

Cincinnati City Council may consider changing the rules for police Taser use. The discussion brought up by several council members is in reaction to an incident Monday where an officer used his Taser on an 11-year-old girl accused of shoplifting at a Kroger on Kennard Avenue.

Updated: 3:20 p.m.

Now, homeless camps are banned from all of Hamilton County by court order. 

The Cincinnati Police Department says an officer responding to a shoplifting report deployed a Taser when one of the alleged shoplifters ignored commands to stop.

The juvenile is identified as an 11-year-old girl.

A Cincinnati Police report on the death of 16-year-old Seven Hills student Kyle Plush found there were technical and personnel problems with the 911 system that prevented police from finding the young man desperate for help.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

In the latest Columbus budget, there's $1 million set aside to install a new system called ShotSpotter. It’s a computer software that uses microphone-like sensors in neighborhoods to detect gunfire, and it tells police nearly exactly where shootings happened. 

Mark Heyne / WVXU

Is Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black in or out? Mayor John Cranley says “yes” and that Black will vacate his post by the end of next week. Black, however, says “I have not quit” and that he “still wants to be city manager.”

What does it all mean, and how did we get here? WVXU breaks it all down with a timeline of events.

The Cincinnati Police Department is pleased with the initial results of ShotSpotter, which is being used to cover a three-square mile area of Avondale.

ShotSpotter uses sensors on rooftops and street lights to listen for gunfire and notify police in 30-45 seconds. There are twenty sensors per square mile.

A new report assessing the use of body cameras raises concerns that police departments could misuse the video footage.  As ideastream’s Mark Urycki reports, police departments in Akron, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland are among those distributing body cameras to its officers.  

 

 

Civil rights organizations The Leadership Conference and Upturn have issued a scorecard measuring 8 concerns about body cameras and not many departments meet their standards. 

The report states:

Beginning in January 2018, Cincinnati Police will dispatch a member of a newly created Women Helping Women special team called DVERT (Domestic Violence Emergency Response Team) to the scene of domestic violence and sexual assault crimes.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Police officers from around Cincinnati are preparing to open their homes to the families of officers affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Pages