CHIP

After letting funding lapse for 114 days, the United States has reached an agreement for funding CHIP, the federally-run health insurance program for children and pregnant mothers.

Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET

So, here we go again.

The federal government is once more on the verge of a shutdown, and just like the last time, in October 2013, there will some things you'll notice that are shuttered and others you won't.

Ohio U.S. Sentators Rob Portman, left, and Sherrod Brown.
Ideastream

Both of Ohio’s Senators want to meet a Friday deadline to avoid a partial government shutdown.

Members of Congress are working on a short-term funding bill to keep the federal government open, but are still debating the inclusion of some controversial measures that likely won’t make the final resolution – like fixes for insolvent workers’ pensions and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA.

Ohio Hospital Groups Urge Government To Renew CHIP Funding

Jan 16, 2018
Summa Health Systems

A coalition of Ohio hospital groups and state agencies are urging passage of the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP.

The Future of Federal CHIP Funding

Jan 16, 2018
Val Gempis, U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

Congress allowed funding for the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to lapse in 2017, leaving an estimated 220,000 Ohio children at risk of losing their health coverage as soon as January 19.

We'll discuss what is causing the unusual delay in appropriating funds for the program and how CHIP families may be impacted in 2018.

Dr. Mahendra Patel, a pediatric cancer doctor, has begun giving away medications to some of his young patients, determined not to disrupt their treatments for serious illnesses like leukemia. He's worried Congress will fail to renew funding soon for a health program that pays for the care of millions of children across the country.

The bill passed by Congress late Thursday to keep most of the federal government funded for another month also provided a temporary reprieve to a number of health programs in danger of running out of money, most notably the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich led an effort by governors of both parties urging Congress to reauthorize funding for the popular Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

This week, Colorado became the first state to notify families that children who receive health insurance through the Children's Health Insurance Program are in danger of losing their coverage.

Ohio U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Sen. Sherrod Brown is expressing frustration at the lack of movement on funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP. The program, which covers 9 million children nationwide, is reauthorized through 2019 but funding for it expired in September.

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