children's health

Halo SleepSack

In 2016, 1,024 Ohio children under the age of 1 died - more than the previous year, despite concerted efforts on the part of government officials and non-profits to curb infant deaths. One of those non-profits, the Columbus-based CelebrateOne, is pushing another effort to keep babies safe. 

Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich led an effort by governors of both parties urging Congress to reauthorize funding for the popular Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

Andrea Sutton, a mom in Firestone, Colo., was trying to put her 3-year-old son Daniel down for a nap, but he wasn't having it. It was January, too cold for him to burn off much energy outside, and he was restless. She read him some books to settle him down and then left him to fall asleep.

She returned with her 4-year-old daughter a little while later to check on him. They found him hanging from the cord of the window blinds, wearing like a necklace the V-shaped strings above a wooden knob that lowers when the blinds go up.

Matt Rourke / Associated Press

For years, efforts to fight Ohio’s infant mortality rate have focused on health care, both for babies and expecting mothers.

A new report says addressing economic issues might be just as effective.

This week, Colorado became the first state to notify families that children who receive health insurance through the Children's Health Insurance Program are in danger of losing their coverage.

Time is running out for Congress to approve more funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program before the money dries up. It's operated by states and Ohio has a plan for the program known as CHIP in case Congress doesn’t act.

For years the Food and Drug Administration has been trying to get doctors to quit prescribing codeine, an opioid painkiller, to children after getting their tonsils or adenoids out.

But it can be hard to get clinicians to change their prescribing habits, even when children have died and other less risky medications are available.

A new report from the March of Dimes finds that Cleveland has the highest rate of premature births in the U.S. The study looked at cities with the 100 highest birth rates.

Pixabay

Children of color in Ohio fair far worse than their white peers when it comes to well-being and opportunity in Ohio.

baby crib mobile
Pexels

The state is working with community leaders trying to find ways to curb the infant mortality crisis. A new report shows that 1,024 babies died before their first birthday last year. That’s a 1.9 percent increase from the previous year.

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