budget

COTA bus in downtown Columbus
WOSU

Ohio lawmakers are still trying to come up with a new plan to replace hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue that public transit agencies and counties lost in the last state budget. The money will be running out earlier than anticipated.

Ohio Budget Director Tim Keen (from left), House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, Governor John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof discuss changes to the state budget.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

State lawmakers overrode six of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 budget vetoes. But one headline-making veto may survive – the one that stops a plan to ask the federal government to increase the tax on managed-care organizations. 

The Ohio Statehouse
Flickr / Creative Commons

After joining the Ohio House in voting to override six of Gov. John Kasich’s budget vetoes last month, the Senate was expected to come back this week to consider overriding more. But the Senate cancelled the session.

In most of Ohio, the kids are back in school, and more than 800,000 of them ride buses to class each day. Figuring out the most efficient and most cost-effective way to do that is a complex equation. And it’s become more important now with student transportation taking a big hit in the new state budget. 

After a fiscal year that showed budget estimates were off for 11 months, a pair of Republican lawmakers wants to change up the budget-making process. They want to create a panel to look at the state’s economic forecast on a more consistent basis. This could ultimately circumvent the process around the governor’s office.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville), Gov. John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) appear at a press conference about the budget in April.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Republican leaders are ready to deliver another blow to Gov. John Kasich. The Senate is likely to give final approval to at least some veto overrides that started in the House. The vote would be more than just a symbolic loss of power for the Kasich Administration.

Kenny Yuko

Senators are expected to come back to the Statehouse on Tuesday and vote on at least one overrides that the House approved last month on 11 of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 budget vetoes.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville), Gov. John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) appear at a press conference about the budget in April.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Last month, state representatives voted to override a budget veto for the first time in 40 years. They actually overrode 11 of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 vetoes. Senators are now deciding which of those overrides to vote on, and that they may ask the House to consider overriding more vetoes.

U.S. House Oversight And Government Reform Committee/Flickr

There were a lot of cuts in this new state budget, largely because tax revenues were off nearly $850 million dollars for the last fiscal year. There’s one budget cut that’s small, but some worry it could have a huge impact on people who really need that money.

Tax form
Ken Teegardin / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been six years since delinquent taxpayers in Ohio were given a chance to pay up without penalties. The new state budget gives them another opportunity at the beginning of next year.

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