body cameras

Julio Cortez / Associated Press

The Columbus Division of Police has fully deployed all of its planned body cameras, covering 1,400 officers across the city.

Columbus Police body camera footage

Columbus Police have cleared two officers of wrongdoing in last summer's shooting death of Kareem Ali Nadir Jones.

Columbus Police

The Franklin County Grand Jury declined to file an indictment against the Columbus Police officers who killed Kareem Ali Nadir Jones.

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

The emergence of police body cameras has caused several communities to solve their own questions about what is and is not public record. Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther joined with Republican state Rep. Niraj Antani to introduce a bill that would provide some definitions.

FIle photo

Democratic Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther joins a Republican state lawmaker on Monday to outline a bill that seeks to clarify Ohio law on when police body camera footage is public record.

Donald W. Cook is a Los Angeles attorney with decades of experience bringing lawsuits over police dog bites — and mostly losing. He blames what he calls "The Rin Tin Tin Effect" — juries think of police dogs as noble, and have trouble visualizing how violent they can be during an arrest.

A new report assessing the use of body cameras raises concerns that police departments could misuse the video footage.  As ideastream’s Mark Urycki reports, police departments in Akron, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland are among those distributing body cameras to its officers.  

 

 

Civil rights organizations The Leadership Conference and Upturn have issued a scorecard measuring 8 concerns about body cameras and not many departments meet their standards. 

The report states:

Having police officers wear little cameras seems to have no discernible impact on citizen complaints or officers' use of force, at least in the nation's capital.

That's the conclusion of a study performed as Washington, D.C., rolled out its huge camera program. The city has one of the largest forces in the country, with some 2,600 officers now wearing cameras on their collars or shirts.

Akron Police

Akron is in the final phase of its million-dollar plan to fully equip its police department with body cams. At a news conference Tuesday, Acting Police Chief Kenneth Ball and Mayor Dan Horrigan said the last of the specialty camcorders are on their way from the manufacturer.

Columbus Police

"Oh my God!" "Why why why why why?" "Keep them back." "Get back, get back, get back."

That's how the audio starts, after two Columbus Police officers shot Kareem Ali Nadir Jones. Taken from the body camera of Samuel James, one of two officers involved, the audio only captures the aftermath of the July 7 shooting.

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