beer

All Sides Weekend: Chefs in the City

Oct 5, 2018
Alan Levine / Flickr

Columbus’s craft beer scene is always changing, with new breweries and craft beer taverns popping up throughout the capital city. 

Brewers such as BrewDog and Rockmill Tavern keep customers and foodies coming back with a surplus of seasonal and new release local beers such as the canned Cerise Cherry Sour from Rockmill’s sour program.

Join us for All Sides with Ann Fisher Chefs in the City, as we talk about Columbus craft beer and breweries.

Guests:

A glass of "Algae Bloom" beer at Maumee Bay Brewing Co. in Toledo. The brewery is making the green, murky beer to draw attention to the algae blooms that taint Lake Erie's water.
John Seewer / AP

There are spicy beers and even peanut butter beers, made to stand out on crowded shelves. Then there's a murky, green brew that looks a lot like algae. It's making a statement on the one ingredient brewers can't do without — clean water.

Workers prepare fora keg for a new batch of beer at Land Grant Brewing in Columbus.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A growing industry in Ohio is calling on local, state, and federal officials to take a serious look at water quality issues. Craft brewery owners say their business completely hinges on safe drinking water.

When Europeans came to Ohio, one of the first crops they cultivated was hops; A small green flower that’s a main ingredients for brewing beer, which was a staple of their diet.

The Ohio Valley provided the perfect soil for the fast growing plant. But, in the early 21st century came Prohibition, plus plant diseases and harmful insects.  So Ohio farmers eventually quit growing hops. 

Michael Lee / WOSU

The tariffs President Trump imposed on imported steel and aluminum have been a drag on a lot of Ohio industries, including Columbus’s local craft beer scene.

From Craft Breweries To Cows

Jun 9, 2018

The beer brewing process kicks off at around 5 a.m. at Mike Hess Brewing. They are creating Hess' craft beers, from an IPA to a darker stout or porter.

But brewing also produces waste — and a lot of it.

The waste is called spent grain, and founder Mike Hess said they make about 20,000 pounds a week.

Last week, women around the U.S. collaborated to make batches of beer.

Here in Massachusetts, more than 20 breweries signed on to highlight women's increasing influence on what's been a male-dominated industry. But many women in the field note there are still challenges.

An imagined conversation between two yeast cells appears in Kurt Vonnegut's 1973 novel Breakfast of Champions. "They were discussing the possible purposes of life," Vonnegut writes. If that's not absurd enough, their existential discussion takes place against a weird, dismal backdrop, "as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement." Little did they know, their little yeasty lives had an important, human-centric purpose.

Masthead Brewing Co. / Facebook

On a quiet Saturday morning at Rozi's wine and beer shop in Lakewood, manager Bill Barak straightens up after a Friday night beer tasting.

Mark Urycki / ideastream

If it seems like there are a lot of young men with beards in Cleveland this week, you’re not imagining it. 

In this new year, beer brewers are enjoying a temporary excise tax break that was signed into federal law as 2017 was winding down.

The Art and Science of Brewing Sour Beer

Dec 20, 2017

If you’re unfamiliar with what sour beer is, the name might sound a bit unappetizing. But the tart, acidic beer is growing in popularity, and Northeast Ohio breweries are making more to meet demand. Platform Beer Company is actually expanding its sour beer production to a new facility. The brewery’s owner, Paul Benner, says the term sour can be somewhat misleading.

“You say the word sour out loud, and it can mean a lot of different things. One of the things it can mean is spoilage,” Benner said. “In beer it’s the complete opposite. If it turns sour, it can be a wonderful thing.”

Craft breweries might be about to crack open a celebratory cold one.

Under the Senate tax bill, alcohol producers would save $4.2 billion from 2018 to 2019, according to Congress' Joint Committee on Taxation.

The measure would help small-brewery owners like Kevin Sharpe, the founder and president of Dark City Brewing Co. He hopes to use the extra money to expand his business in Asbury Park, N.J.

"More money means better beer, and hopefully more of it," he said.

On this day 500 years ago, an obscure Saxon monk launched a protest movement against the Catholic Church that would transform Europe. Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation changed not just the way Europeans lived, fought, worshipped, worked and created art but also how they ate and drank. For among the things it impacted was a drink beloved throughout the world and especially in Luther's native Germany: beer.

The change in beer production was wrought by the pale green conical flower of a wildly prolific plant — hops.

Chris Hernstrom was brewing in the craft beer mecca of Bend, Ore., when an ad caught his eye: Want to live somewhere gorgeous and make beer for a small community?

"It just seemed like an interesting challenge to come out to basically the exact opposite of Bend, some place where the brewing industry is still in its fledgling stages," Hernstrom says.

That place, Hernstrom's new home, is the cattle ranching hub of Valentine, Neb., population 2,700, tucked into the Niobrara River valley in the Sand Hills.

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