beer

A glass of "Algae Bloom" beer at Maumee Bay Brewing Co. in Toledo. The brewery is making the green, murky beer to draw attention to the algae blooms that taint Lake Erie's water.
John Seewer / AP

There are spicy beers and even peanut butter beers, made to stand out on crowded shelves. Then there's a murky, green brew that looks a lot like algae. It's making a statement on the one ingredient brewers can't do without — clean water.

Workers prepare fora keg for a new batch of beer at Land Grant Brewing in Columbus.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A growing industry in Ohio is calling on local, state, and federal officials to take a serious look at water quality issues. Craft brewery owners say their business completely hinges on safe drinking water.

When Europeans came to Ohio, one of the first crops they cultivated was hops; A small green flower that’s a main ingredients for brewing beer, which was a staple of their diet.

The Ohio Valley provided the perfect soil for the fast growing plant. But, in the early 21st century came Prohibition, plus plant diseases and harmful insects.  So Ohio farmers eventually quit growing hops. 

Michael Lee / WOSU

The tariffs President Trump imposed on imported steel and aluminum have been a drag on a lot of Ohio industries, including Columbus’s local craft beer scene.

From Craft Breweries To Cows

Jun 9, 2018

The beer brewing process kicks off at around 5 a.m. at Mike Hess Brewing. They are creating Hess' craft beers, from an IPA to a darker stout or porter.

But brewing also produces waste — and a lot of it.

The waste is called spent grain, and founder Mike Hess said they make about 20,000 pounds a week.

Last week, women around the U.S. collaborated to make batches of beer.

Here in Massachusetts, more than 20 breweries signed on to highlight women's increasing influence on what's been a male-dominated industry. But many women in the field note there are still challenges.

An imagined conversation between two yeast cells appears in Kurt Vonnegut's 1973 novel Breakfast of Champions. "They were discussing the possible purposes of life," Vonnegut writes. If that's not absurd enough, their existential discussion takes place against a weird, dismal backdrop, "as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement." Little did they know, their little yeasty lives had an important, human-centric purpose.

Masthead Brewing Co. / Facebook

On a quiet Saturday morning at Rozi's wine and beer shop in Lakewood, manager Bill Barak straightens up after a Friday night beer tasting.

Mark Urycki / ideastream

If it seems like there are a lot of young men with beards in Cleveland this week, you’re not imagining it. 

In this new year, beer brewers are enjoying a temporary excise tax break that was signed into federal law as 2017 was winding down.

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