addiction treatment

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An Ohio lawmaker wants the state to take tougher action when an ex-convict on parole fails a random drug test. The proposal is meant to act as an intervention for addicts.

As the opioid crisis continued to plague communities across the country, this year. several states have joined a handful of others in declaring opioid emergencies. President Trump recently labeled the crisis a national public "health emergency." That drew attention to the issue, but did not come with any new funding.

Digital Works

A handful of students sit in a classroom, inside an old school building on the South Side of Columbus. Columbus resident David Givens is one of them.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio-based community activists cleared one hurdle in their campaign for the “Neighborhood Safety, Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation” amendment.

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, it came with a regulatory change intended to make it easier for people to get care. The declaration allows for doctors to prescribe addiction medicine virtually, without ever seeing the patient in person.

In Indiana, this kind of virtual visit has been legal since early 2017. So I called about a dozen addiction specialists in Indiana to find out how it was going. But no one had heard of doctors using telemedicine for opioid addiction treatment until I ran across Dr. Jay Joshi.

Pablo Martinez / Associated Press

Local communities who were hoping for new money in President Trump’s public health emergency declaration to fight the addiction crisis were disappointed. There are some initiatives that are giving advocates hope, though.

braking point

In the middle of an ongoing investigation by the FBI, the Ohio Department of Medicaid has revoked privileges from an Ohio chain of for-profit addiction treatment centers called Braking Point.

Tia Hosler woke up at 7:35 a.m. on a friend’s couch next to her newborn son’s crib after an overnight babysitting gig.

The 26-year-old had slept through her alarm and was late for the bus, her ride to group therapy in Fort Wayne, Indiana. And now she had to scramble. She tied her Kool-Aid-red hair into a tight bun and kissed her 2-month-old, Marsean. 


It's always appealing to think that there could be an easy technical fix for a complicated and serious problem.

For example, wouldn't it be great to have a vaccine to prevent addiction?

"One of the things they're actually working on is a vaccine for addiction, which is an incredibly exciting prospect," said Dr. Tom Price, secretary of Health and Human Services.

At a lunch on Wednesday, President Trump tried to persuade some reluctant senators to endorse repealing the Affordable Care Act.

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