ACA

Ohio Republican Governor candidate Mike DeWine speaks while running mate Jon Husted looks on.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich insists that Ohio needs to fight to protect coverage for pre-existing conditions in the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 5 million Ohioans could be affected if that requirement were tossed out.

The Trump administration said Saturday that it is temporarily halting billions of dollars of payments designed to help insurers meet the Affordable Care Act requirement that they provide coverage regardless of whether a person is healthy or sick.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio should be doing everything it can to defend the Affordable Care Act's requirement of health care coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. This once again positions Kasich against President Donald Trump, who has said his administration will not fight for the law.

Protestors rally in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program known as DACA outside the offices of Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, Sept. 5, 2017, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / AP

A new poll shows overall, nearly seven in 10 Ohio voters surveyed say they are very or somewhat satisfied with the way things are going in Ohio right now. They also weighed in on issues like tariffs on Chinese products and immigration.

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The federal government has rejected Ohio’s attempt to end the individual mandate for health care. The mandate is a staple of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Health care advocates say lawmakers should take this as a sign to work with Obamacare instead of against it.

Final 2018 open enrollment numbers for the Affordable Care Act are out this week, and 230,000 Ohioans have signed up, a decrease of about 4 percent from last year.

Ohio ranks 13th of 39 states in the number of new consumers and re-enrollments. The majority of sign-ups came from people between the ages of 55 and 64.

The Trump administration wants to allow insurance companies to offer more policies that have limited health benefits and that can reject customers if they have pre-existing medical conditions.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says the plans, which don't meet the legal requirements for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, will allow consumers who can't afford insurance now to find cheaper plans.

The Department of Labor on Thursday released proposed new rules that proponents say will make it easier for businesses to band together in “associations” to buy health insurance.

Valeri Potapova / Shutterstock

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released data this week on the number of people who signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act for 2018. The federal data shows numbers on 39 states that use HealthCare.gov, the federal health marketplace, to sign up for insurance.

A day after President Trump said the Affordable Care Act "has been repealed," officials reported that 8.8 million Americans have signed up for coverage on the federal insurance exchange for 2018 — nearly reaching the 2017 number in half the sign-up time.

That total is far from complete. Enrollment is still open in parts of seven states, including Florida and Texas, that use the federal HealthCare.gov exchange but were affected by hurricanes earlier this year.

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