2018 election

Steve Dettelbach, Democratic Attorney General nominee
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

A nominee for statewide office is breaking away from the top of the ticket when it comes to Issue 1. The constitutional amendment would reduce criminal sentences for non-violent drug offenders, and it’s becoming a major issue for several campaigns. 

We are very happy to not have to decide if Democratic congressional candidate Aftab Pureval is guilty of misusing campaign funds, as has been alleged before the Ohio Elections Commission.

Gender gaps aren't just for the workplace, and the midterm elections are proving it. An NPR analysis of campaign finance records shows that Democratic women candidates face a fundraising gap, compared to Democratic men, in the party's toughest House races.

David Dermer / Associated Press

Tuesday, Sept. 25 is National Voter Registration Day. Some groups are working hard to encourage voters to register and cast ballots in the midterm election this November.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Their doctors say both major-party candidates for Ohio governor are in good health.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Gov. John Kasich says he’ll do what many of his fellow Republicans say they’ll do this fall when it comes to the statewide ballot issue that would change criminal sentencing to prefer treatment over prison time.

The Ohio Election Commission will do its own investigation into whether or not Democratic congressional candidate Aftab Pureval improperly spent money from his state campaign fund on his federal race.

That would be a violation of Ohio election law.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Gary Landers / Associated Press

Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray went head-to-head in their first debate in the race for governor. The two traded jabs in what escalated into a heated debate over their records.

Women represent 20 percent of Congress members right now, and Republicans and Democrats differ sharply on why that's the case, not to mention how big of a problem that is.

That in and of itself is perhaps unsurprising, especially at a time when the parties are heavily divided on a wide variety of topics. But a new poll shows that men and women within each party — and especially among Republicans — differ heavily on several of these questions.

If you thought for a moment that the choice between Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray for Ohio governor was a choice between Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum, get over it.

The deputy director of the Hamilton County Board of Elections said this morning she blacked out the memo line on four checks after Sarah Topy, Aftab Pureval's campaign manager asked her if it was legal to do so. 

Sally Krisel, a long-time employee of the board and former elections director, said Thursday morning that she believed it was legal. 

Krisel apologized to the board of elections and elections director Sherry Poland at an "emergency meeting" of the elections board held this morning.

David Pepper, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman, with the party's statewide candidates
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Now that we're past Labor Day, political campaigns are intensifying. It's the time when voters are more likely to pay attention to the choices they will be making in November.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Environmental advocates are pushing their support for Democrat Rich Cordray in his campaign for governor. They say that, between him and Republican Mike DeWine, Cordray is the one who will back environmental protections and support clean energy.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray shakes hands with supporters during an election night event Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Columbus.
Jay LaPrete / AP

On Tuesday, the Ohio Patrolmen's Benevolent Association became the second statewide police union to endorse Democratic candidate Rich Cordray for governor. It's a major about-face: The union endorsed Republican Mike DeWine in the 2014 attorney general race.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

As the confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh neared, both parties had seen potential political benefits for them in the upcoming midterm elections.

For Republicans, it was a chance to energize the base by putting another conservative justice on the court, potentially reshaping it for a generation.

For Democrats, the specter of rolling back abortion rights, the Affordable Care Act and more was a way to further energize an already engaged liberal base to go to the polls.

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