2018 election

Poll workers at the Franklin County Elections Board handing voters their ballots.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The Franklin County Commission plans to spend $245,000 on ads for early voting. The board of elections has done that in the past, but Republican board members argue it’s no longer necessary.

Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the latest gubernatorial debate and why you probably didn't watch it.

The leader of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus joined with some Cleveland City Council members and other local officials to support Issue 1 at a news conference Thursday morning.

The proposed constitutional amendment would reduce penalties for drug possession, reclassifying lower-level felonies as misdemeanors. It would also allow incarcerated people, with some exceptions, to shorten their prison sentences by taking part in job and education programs.  

President Donald Trump returns to Southwest Ohio Friday for an evening rally in Warren County.

The event at the Warren County Fairgrounds is expected to draw large crowds.

The Warren County Sheriff's Office is urging rally-goers to anticipate traffic delays and plan accordingly.

Doors Friday will open at 4 p.m., three hours ahead of the rally’s scheduled 7 p.m. start.

Associated Press

Early voting is now underway in Ohio, which has seen strong Republican wins in the last two midterm election cycles. But many are wondering about the impact of an increase in registered voters in a midterm year that looks good nationwide for Democrats.

Ohio House

As groupsassociations, and individual polticians around Ohio line up against a statewide ballot issue to cut jail time for some drug offenders, one group remains steadfast in their support.

The Hamilton County elections official who marked out the spending lines on campaign checks from Democratic congressional candidate Aftab Pureval will be docked two weeks vacation time as her punishment.

Betsy Rader

Dissatisfaction with current elected officials has led a number of newcomers to jump into the political arena this midterm election. One of the biggest challenges they face is raising enough money to run a competitive campaign.

Franklin County Board of Elections director David Payne talks to a voter on Saturday, the day after the county set an all-time in-person early voting record of more than 6,800 voters.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Voting rights groups scurried throughout Ohio to meet the deadline for voter registration, and one reached out to possible voters in unusual ways.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Early voting is now underway in Ohio as the registration deadline has passed. Voting starts Wednesday, while Ohio has seen an influx in registered voters.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Gary Landers / Associated Press

A new poll has gubernatorial hopefuls Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Rich Cordray running neck-and-neck with just a month before the election. Analysts are saying they’re seeing numbers that go against the theory of a so-called “Blue Wave.”

So who, besides Brett Kavanaugh and Donald Trump, won this nasty, bitter, ugly mud-wrestling match that was Kavanaugh's narrow confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court?

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray, left, and Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine wave to the crowd before a debate at Marietta College on Monday.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

The Democratic candidate for Ohio governor wants more debates in the tightly contested race, while his Republican rival said three was enough.

Lakewood High School Walkout / Twitter

One school district wants funding to expand mental health services. The district next door wants to hire more school resource officers. Another neighboring district wants both.

Ohio Treasurer candidates Democrat Cincinnati attorney Rob Richardson Jr. and Republican Rep. Robert Sprague
Rob Richardson Jr. / Ohio House

The five statewide executive offices will all turn over this year because of term limits on their occupants. The person elected treasurer will oversee Ohio’s $21.5 billion portfolio of investments, and will manage the collection of billions in state revenues.

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