Marketplace

6pm Weekdays on 89.7 NPR News
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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What people get wrong when they talk about NAFTA

8 hours ago
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Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes? Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

Why your robot restaurant might get sued

9 hours ago

About half a dozen kiosks stand ready to take your order at Eatsa in midtown New York. With the help of technology, the fast-food startup basically eliminated the need for front-of-the-house staff. Hungry New Yorkers walk in, key in their order, pay and then pick up their order from one of the nearby cubicles. No human interaction necessary.

That is, unless you are blind.

There's been another sharp drop in the markets this week, following a delayed vote on the GOP's health care bill. FTN Financial's Chris Low joins us to explain why there's a connection between the two. Next, we'll talk about one indie music label's investment in vinyl records, and then look at the effect that interest rate hikes from the Fed will have on the automobile market. 

Senate votes to end Obama-era privacy rules

13 hours ago

Most congressional headlines are focused on health care this week, but another bill is on the move that could kill off internet privacy protections.

The Senate voted Thursday to put a stop to Obama administration privacy rules that would prevent internet providers like Comcast and Verizon from selling consumer browsing information. The bill looks likely to pass the House and be signed into law by President Trump.

Starting next Monday, customers of Wells Fargo bank will be able to make ATM withdrawals nationwide without a card using a smartphone. The trend could spread quickly to other banks around the country as consumers grow more used to advanced banking technology.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

New York plans to boost broadband infrastructure

15 hours ago

The New York is looking to bridge the digital divide by bringing broadband access to every household in the Empire State by the end of next year. It would be the first state in the country to pull that off. Many poor and rural areas lack broadband. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

My Economy: Caring for seniors through art

Mar 23, 2017
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Robert Garrova

For this latest installment of our series My Economy, we hear from Martha Rast, a therapeutic art teacher living in Tuscon, Arizona.

“My name is Martha Rast, and I teach therapeutic art lessons.

It’s way better than cool. It’s the best job in the world — I love it. Any kind of therapeutic experience, really, has to be human-to-human. Because the one thing machines cannot do yet, and I don’t think they ever really will, even if there’s AI, is really truly understand emotional intelligence.

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Kai Ryssdal

Liza Mundy’s cover story in the current issue of The Atlantic, “Why Is Silicon Valley So Awful to Women,” draws on a long history of sexism in high tech and in Silicon Valley in particular.

As farmworkers grow scarce, wages are on the rise

Mar 23, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal

Tighter borders were supposed to mean more jobs for native-born Americans. That's the theory anyway, but California farmers aren't living in that world. Instead, they're competing for a workforce where nine out of 10 people are immigrants, and many are undocumented. While some farmers are raising wages well above the minimum to attract workers, many others can't afford to. Los Angeles Times economy writer Natalie Kitroeff visited several California farmers to see how they're coping with a smaller workforce. Host Kai Ryssdal spoke with Kitroeff about what she learned.

ICE union to Trump: Come drain our swamp

Mar 23, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

President Donald Trump’s plans for immigration policy enforcement call on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to hire thousands of new employees, but union reps are saying that’s not going to happen without some changes.

Union presidents representing Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents and Customs and Border Protection agents voiced their concerns Wednesday, citing an arduous hiring process and low morale as obstacles to Trump’s hiring directives, even as they lauded the president’s dedication to immigration enforcement.

03/23/17: When your government is a bank robber

Mar 23, 2017

Last week, 258,000 applied for unemployment benefits last week. While these numbers move around week to week, the latest figures indicate a large spike. Diane Swonk, the CEO of DS Economics, breaks down the causes of this increase, which include bad weather. Next, we'll talk about new research that looks at the connection between the mortality rate and job opportunities. And finally, we'll discuss North Korea's possible involvement in a mega bank heist at the New York Fed.

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Mark Garrison

New research finds America’s education gap is increasingly a matter of life and death, and lack of job opportunity may be to blame.

A new Brookings Institution paper finds alarming midlife mortality increases for less-educated white Americans. It’s a topic with increasing relevance as policy questions swirl about how to create stable jobs that support families as well as presidential election results that reveal a swath of America deeply frustrated with their economic state.

In spite of a whole lot of predictions to the contrary, the movie industry is hanging in, even as competition for our attention grows. According to a new report from the Motion Picture Association of America, ticket sales in the U.S. and Canada were flat compared to last year. One bright spot – it turns out the movie industry is attracting a more diverse audience.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Trump set to reshape the Wall Street regulation?

Mar 23, 2017

The Senate Banking Committee is scheduled to hold a confirmation hearing Thursday on Jay Clayton, President Donald Trump’s choice to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Clayton does not have a track record in Washington, and that makes it difficult to know if he shares Trump’s distaste for government regulation. But we can tell something from his past experience in the private sector.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

California’s had one of the wettest winters on record — more than twice as much rain and snow as in an average year. That's especially wild since we're six years into a historic drought. But California doesn't have enough dams, reservoirs or other storage. So instead of using it, all that precipitation just joins the Pacific Ocean.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Did NAFTA cost or create jobs? Both

Mar 22, 2017
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Sabri Ben-Achour

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes?  Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

What did the North American Free Trade Agreement do?

More trouble for iconic retailer Sears

Mar 22, 2017

In a financial filing on Tuesday, Sears said "substantial doubt exists related to the company's ability to continue as a going concern." The announcement hit the company's shares hard. Sears reported a loss of more than $2 billion in 2016. What does this disclosure mean for the retailer and is there any hope of a turnaround? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Key stock indicators are down again this morning. The possible cause this time? Washington politics. Susan Schmidt from Westwood Holdings Group explains why uncertainty over the House GOP's health care bill could be affecting the stock market's movement. We'll also look at why there may be a decline in existing home sales for February, and then explore the rise of virtual reality exhibits at museums. 

 

What it's like to live and work in H-1B visa limbo

Mar 22, 2017
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Sally Herships

This is the part in a story where normally we’d introduce you to a character to help draw you in and set the scene. But almost all the foreign workers on H-1B visas that I talked to — and I spoke to more than 10 people — won't let me tell you their names. They’re too scared.

I received a lot of emails like these:

 

 

And this:

Existing home sales numbers for February are out today. January sales increased 3.3 percent to a 10-year high, but economists anticipate a dip for February, although that’s still up from last year. One factor: an improving job market. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin a decade ago and proposed an ambitious political strategy to undermine anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics, The Associated Press has learned. The work appears to contradict assertions by the Trump administration and Manafort himself that he never worked for Russian interests.

Wastewater: our most overlooked water source?

Mar 22, 2017

March 22 is World Water Day, and this year’s theme is wastewater. The United Nations is hoping to shed light on the value of all the water we literally flush down the toilet. Other countries use wastewater, but the idea hasn’t taken hold in the U.S.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Annie Baxter

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes?  Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

The latest travel ban targets electronic devices

Mar 21, 2017
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Reema Khrais

There’s news today of another travel-related ban from the Trump administration, but this one impacts what happens when you get on the plane. Passengers coming to the U.S. on direct flights from eight countries in the Middle East and North Africa will not be able to carry anything larger than a smartphone on the plane.

Administration officials cite security for the new travel restrictions, but they didn’t point to any specific threat. Some of the people who will be most impacted are business travelers, and it’s also not good news for airlines in the region.

03/21/17: GOP tweaks health care bill

Mar 21, 2017

The House GOP is out with some revisions for its Obamacare replacement, with the aim of drawing more support for the bill. We'll look at what some of these proposed changes are, which include more tax credits. Next, we'll explore Emory University's decision to call itself a "safe harbor" instead of a "sanctuary campus" over concerns that it could be defunded. And finally, we'll talk about the other competition happening amid March Madness: the shoe companies vying to be number one on the market.

House Republicans look for more support with revised health care bill

Mar 21, 2017
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D Gorenstein and Marketplace staff

Top House Republicans have released a slate of revisions for their Obamacare replacement that they hope will draw more support. The American Health Care Act has been sharply criticized by members of both parties; an analysis from the Congressional Budget Office estimated that nearly 24 million people would lose their coverage under the plan.

Nike makes a full-court press

Mar 21, 2017

March Madness is upon us and college basketball teams aren’t the only ones competing. The games are also a battleground for shoe and apparel brands like Nike, Adidas and Under Armour. Nike still rules when it comes to sponsorships, but the competition is gaining.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Museums embrace virtual reality

Mar 21, 2017
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Adrienne Hill

Between the megamouth shark, the bison diorama, and gangs of excited school kids, the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County has added a virtual reality exhibit called theBlu.

For an extra $10, on top of the $12 general admission fee, visitors can strap on a headset and explore the virtual ocean. A blue whale swims overhead. A school of silvery fish darts by. Visitors use virtual flashlights to explore the abyss.

Want to know when it’s a good time to go to the hospital? Seems it’s when the doctors are being watched. Every few years the accrediting agency known as the Joint Commission conducts random hospital inspections. A new study out in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine finds that mortality rates drop when the inspectors show up for their surprise visit.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Hello, goodbye: When execs make a quick exit

Mar 20, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

On Sunday, Uber confirmed that its president Jeff Jones resigned just six months after taking the job. Jones said he decided to leave because his values no longer aligned with those of Uber.

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