Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m. on 89.7 NPR News
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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(Markets Edition) The Fed has hinted that it wants to tap the economic brakes again. We'll talk to economist Diane Swonk about why the Fed is so worried about the economy. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report that shows more Americans are prioritizing savings. Over half say they now have more emergency savings than credit card debt. Plus: A debate in France over how to pay for saving crumbling cathedrals.

Save more or owe more?

4 hours ago

With wages and incomes up, more Americans say they are saving for a rainy day. But it might be wiser to use the money to pay down debt. Marketplace's Aaron Schrank explains.

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Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral is in a dismal state of disrepair and needs $70 million for urgent renovations, according to Michel Picaud, head of Friends of Notre Dame de Paris. One possible solution for the famous church and other religious monuments is to ask patrons to pay an entrance fee, but so far the Church has been against that.

Productivity is poised to rise. Finally.

19 hours ago

Labor productivity, a measure of how efficient workers are, hasn't been improving in recent years. That has caused worry among economists, because worker productivity has a big impact on economic growth. Well, times may be a-changing. The McKinsey Global Institute is out with a new report that says this era of low productivity growth might finally be coming to an end.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Mayor eyes downtown development for Erie turnaround

19 hours ago

President Trump pledged sweeping political and economic changes during the campaign. We have no idea if Trump can deliver on those promises, but we can explore what it’s going to take for him to try. It’s all in our series The Big Promise.

This week, hundreds of African-American women will meet in Atlanta for Power Rising, a conference to talk about ways to make their voices better heard in politics, economics and other areas.

Black women own about 1.5 million businesses in the country, according to the latest U.S. Census figures, generating more than $42 billion in sales in 2012. Conference organizers say they want black women to find ways to make the most of their political and economic power.

Why low unemployment might not lead to higher inflation

Feb 21, 2018

Our ideas about the relationship between the unemployment rate and inflation may be all wrong. 

The latest jobs report revealed that the unemployment rate is at 4.1 percent for a fourth straight month — the lowest level since 2000. But that means that the economy may be heating up, which also means that the Federal Reserve may want to put the brakes on that by raising interest rates.

For people who work indoors, snow, ice, and subfreezing temperatures are often nothing more than an inconvenience. But for construction companies and their employees, harsh winter weather can be something more — a financial and physical hazard.

Cities across the country — from large urban areas like Chicago to smaller ones like Cleveland — are in the midst of a multiyear building boom, with developers racing to meet pent-up demand for housing and office space. And with billions of dollars in play and deadlines to meet, the work rarely stops even when the weather turns ice cold.

02/21/2018: Parkland, Florida students mobilize

Feb 21, 2018

(U.S. Edition) A group of survivors from the Parkland, Florida mass shooting last week are lobbying for gun control laws, and they're getting a lot of financial support. We'll take a look at some of the steps they've taken to mobilize, along with some of the donors who are supporting the cause. Afterwards, we'll examine the criteria Texas uses to fund its colleges and universities, and then we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about why he thinks there was that big drop in markets earlier this month. 

Should credit card companies tackle gun sales?

Feb 20, 2018

Andrew Ross Sorkin had an interesting column in the New York Times yesterday — a business and economic take on how to make mass shootings less common. PayPal and Square, Sorkin pointed out, decided years ago not to let people use their services to buy guns. What about Mastercard and Visa, he wondered. Or the big banks that issue credit cards? Why can't — or won't — they do the same?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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