Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m. on 89.7 NPR News
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

Ways to Connect

(Markets Edition) When it comes to the market, traders look at three influential figures: the chair of the Fed, its vice chair, and the president of the New York Fed. We'll talk to Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, about why some were "disturbed" by what John Williams, the next NY Fed president, recently had to say at a press conference in Madrid. Afterwards, we'll look at one major domestic appliance company that could come out ahead amid all this tariff talk. Whirlpool may have an advantage thanks to a protective tariff on foreign washing machines. 

Critics of President Donald Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs say the policies hurt U.S. manufacturers that use a lot of those materials. And one industry likely to feel the pinch of higher production costs: home appliance manufacturers. Still, at least one major domestic appliance company, Whirlpool Corp., may come out ahead, thanks to another protective tariff — on foreign washing machines.

Ideastream's Adrian Ma is with the Marketplace Hub in Cleveland.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

04/20/2018: The cannabis brand wars

7 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) There are reports that Wells Fargo is close to a $1 billion settlement with federal regulators after charging customers for car insurance they didn't need. On today's show, we'll recap the controversy. Afterwards, we'll talk to Drake Sutton-Shearer, CEO of PROHBTD Media, about how quality cannabis brands could start emerging within the next decade, Wall Street's valuation of the industry, and his push to change the "stoner" stereotypes surrounding the product. Plus: A look at the financial struggles General Electric is facing. 

We're still waiting to see which company will become the Grey Goose of marijuana.

Right now, there isn't a whole lot of brand awareness about specific cannabis companies. But with marijuana legalization on the rise, that could all change within the next decade. 

Tight labor market, tight … jeans?

20 hours ago

It’s a tight labor market out there – so in a quest to attract workers, Walmart is trying out something new – allowing workers on the stores’ floors to wear jeans and solid shirts in any color. The new policy is being tested in less than two dozen stores. 

 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Seven months after Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico is still recovering

21 hours ago

It's been seven months since Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, and the island is still facing some serious problems. This week, an islandwide power outrage left most of Puerto Rico in the dark. And teachers along with parents have been protesting the Education Department's plan to close 283 schools. Host Kai Ryssdal checks in with Marketplace reporter Lizzie O'Leary on the latest news of Puerto Rico's recovery. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

The rent is too damn high, according to a new Pew report

22 hours ago

In 2015, 38 percent of renter households spent more than 30 percent of their gross income on housing, according to a new report released today by Pew Charitable Trusts. The Pew report said high rates of families living in such a precarious financial state threatens the long-term economic mobility of American families, and has implications for the economy as a whole.

(Markets Edition) The International Monetary Fund — which gets called to the rescue when economies melt down — meets in Washington. We'll talk to Diane Swonk, chief economist at the firm Grant Thornton, about one especially big worry that's looming: world debt. And the leader of that happens to be the U.S. Afterwards, we'll look at why rivals Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions, and then we'll explore how a rise in trawlers off the coast of Senegal is causing local fishermen to lose their livelihoods.

Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions. As part of the deal, Best Buy will sell Amazon smart TVs in their stores and on Amazon as a third-party merchant. What’s bringing two apparent rivals together to sell expensive gadgets to consumers?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Central bankers and finance ministers from around the world are in Washington this week for the International Monetary Fund and World Bank's annual spring meeting. We'll look at some of the major concerns likely to be addressed, which include government debt.

Pages