Here & Now

Weekdays from 2-4 p.m. on 89.7 NPR News
  • Hosted by Robin Young , Jeremy Hobson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Las Vegas hotel and casino workers have voted to authorize a strike as early as next month. Contracts for about 50,000 culinary and bartender union workers expire at the end of May.

Workers are demanding a bigger share of the casino profits, but also protections against the use of robots and artificial intelligence to automate service jobs.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with the Culinary Union’s Bethany Khan (@BethanyKhan) about those demands.

President Trump said on Twitter on Wednesday that he’s going to sign into law “big changes” to the Dodd-Frank banking regulations put in place after the financial crisis.

The bill passed the House late Tuesday, with supporters saying it would make it easier for midsize and regional banks to lend. It already passed the Senate in March.

A mountain biker has died and a second person was seriously injured after a cougar attacked them on a remote trail in Washington state.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Richard A. Beausoleil, bear and cougar specialist with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife.

Health workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo began vaccinating people Monday against an outbreak of Ebola that’s killed at least 26 people. The experimental drug was tested in Guinea two years ago with a 100 percent success rate, but this is the first time a vaccine will be used to control an Ebola outbreak.

Mike Shirkey grew up in the Arkansas Delta, listening to “pickin’ music” — bluegrass, country, folk and the like. Years later, in 1980, he started the show “The Pickin’ Post” on KUAF to highlight some of his favorite musical finds, often bypassing the latest trends and releases.

The traditional fish hooks used by the Makah Tribe in Washington state have been found to be better at catching halibut than modern circle fish hooks.

As John Ryan (@heyjohnryan) of KUOW reports, the historical hooks help prevent the problems of “bycatch” — hauling up the wrong type of fish.

Democratic strategist Jamal Simmons (@JamalSimmons) and Republican strategist Paris Dennard (@PARISDENNARD) join Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and Peter O’Dowd to discuss results of primaries in four states Tuesday, and other news from Washington.

Federal food benefit programs are vital for low-income immigrant families. But if a parent is unauthorized to live in the U.S., they may decide not to enroll their children who are citizens in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP to get money for groceries.

Literary Giant Tom Wolfe Dies

May 15, 2018

Literary giant Tom Wolfe, who chronicled everything from hippies to the space program before turning his eye to fiction, has died. Wolfe was known for creating a “New Journalism” and writing bestsellers that defined eras of American life. His books included “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” and “The Bonfire of the Vanities.”

Since the opioid crisis took off in the U.S., cities across the country have added more and more needle exchange programs, which allow people with addiction to turn in used syringes for new, clean ones.

Most researchers say such programs are effective at reducing the spread of HIV and hepatitis C. However, some cities — including Charleston, West Virginia, where opioid use is pervasive — have moved to close their needle exchanges, citing problems with crime and mismanagement.

Pages