Classical Music with Jennifer Hambrick

Weekdays 10am-3pm and Sundays 10am-1pm

Jennifer Hambrick unites her extensive backgrounds in the arts and media, and her deep roots in Columbus to bring inspiring music to central Ohio as Classical 101’s midday host.

Classical 101 went to the picture shows Thursday morning with brand-new music written by a Central Ohio composer for a classic Charlie Chaplin film.

color photo of the flutist, cellist and violinist of Infusion Baroque playing thier instruments
WOSU Public Media

The award-winning, Montreal-based early music ensemble Infusion Baroque performed live in the Classical 101 studio this morning, and we captured the performance—and the dish about composers doing things they shouldn’t do—on video.

color photo of the four musicians of Infusion Baroque wearing black gowns and holding violins and recorders
Elizabeth Delage / infusionbaroque.com

It’s one thing to give elegant, award-winning performances of music composed by Baroque-era composers who were, as my Kentucky grandmother used to say, no better than they oughta be. It’s quite another thing to serve up the dirt about the composers, too.

Friday morning at 11, get the scuttlebutt on Sebastian Bach and hear all the jabber about Jean-Marie Leclair live on Classical 101 and on Classical 101’s Facebook page (we'll have a Facebook Live video so you can watch as you listen along). Montreal-based Infusion Baroque will be in our studios the day of the ensemble's debut album release to perform a preview of “Rebels and Rivalries,” a program of sublime music and all the news about some Baroque composers that's not fit to print.

black-and-white still photo of Charlie Chaplin as the Little Tramp and sitting on a snowy landscape in The Gold Rush
Flickr

There might not be a lot of chatter in Charlie Chaplin’s films, but there’s certainly a lot of chatter about them—at least in this neck of the woods. Thursday morning, some of that Chaplin chatter will be on Classical 101. 

Liberace with candelabras
Allan Warren / Wikimedia Commons

As the saying goes, laugh and the world laughs with you; cry and you cry alone.

And — hello? — who wants to cry alone?

Kaupo Kikkas / Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

The Baltic nation of Estonia is home to one of the world’s most esteemed choral traditions, rich with gigantic choral festivals and some of the finest professional choirs around, and inextricably linked with Estonia’s political history.

One of the crown jewels among Estonia’s choral treasures is the multi-Grammy Award-winning Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir. This Saturday, Feb. 4, Columbus music lovers will have a chance to hear the choir sing and its artistic director talk about the choir’s work within Estonia’s fascinating choral music tradition.

colorphoto of Benedict Cumberbatch and James Rhodes sitting at a grand piano
from YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm4OKds30k8

A couple of years ago, The New Yorker published a cartoon by Joe Dator that truly catches the spirit of our times.

In the single panel, a pregnant woman undergoing an ultrasound exam looks befuddledly at a face on the ultrasound monitor screen. The mouth of the woman giving the exam is slightly open, as though in mid-speech. The cartoon’s caption reads, “Oh, don’t worry. That’s Benedict Cumberbatch. He’s in everything.” View the cartoon here.

Some of the traditional Chinese musical instruments on display in the Legacy of Imperial Beijing: The Bliss M. and Mildred A. Wiant Collection of Chinese Art exhibition at OSU's Urban Arts Space.
CHRISTINA MATHISON / OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Behind every great piano and every great pianist is a technician on whom everything depends. For most of the last half century in Columbus, that piano technician has been Ben Wiant.

Two recent events — one musical, the other related to the world of Chinese art — have brought Wiant out from behind the scenes and into the spotlight.

Every January, when I take down the holiday decorations that adorn my apartment walls, I’m always struck by how abruptly empty my home feels in comparison. A similar feeling comes when I look at my calendar, which seems to shift from endless holiday parties and seasonal social engagements to not much of anything overnight.

color photograph of Worthington's Tröndlin fortepiano
Robert Murphy

A rare fortepiano from the age of Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Schumann returns to its Worthington home Saturday with a five-figure makeover and as star of its own show at Worthington’s historic Orange Johnson House.

Reportedly one of only three extant fortepianos in the United States made by the 19th-century Leipzig-based piano builder Johann Tröndlin, the instrument returns to Worthington after an extensive two-year restoration by Oberlin conservatory piano technician and early piano restorer Robert Murphy.

color photo of severl yellow metal ballot boxes stacked on top of each other
Keith Bacongco/Creative Commons/Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/kitoy/1597912606/in/photolist-3rcHKm-5ziqP6-rP2gM-5uxGEu-5x1T6X-5zuKiW-7dcgvZ-rMpQF-fLia6J-j6dUHb-cCyNDb-5A4jmj-CwtyM-rRgtw-rMpRX-9oXneQ-5VmNpy-zHqerj-5urX6M-5mhUsr-8QbzPP-4mmorw-5utjB6-5wo7eE-5zKnjG-6DxhSz-rP21c-bpfGP4-dfdR-

You’ve read the headlines, heard the great radio news reports on WOSU 89.7 NPR News, watched the debates (don’t remind me) and, having seen and heard enough about Election 2016, you’ve cast your vote.

So, what will you do with your Tuesday evening, now that all is said and done for another four years? 

color headshot of Jordan Dodson
publicity photo / http://www.columbusguitarsociety.org/Welcome.html

It’s been almost three years since guitar virtuoso and Grove City native Jordan Dodson first performed on Classical 101.

color photo taken from behind the musicians of the Dublin Win Symphony during a rehearsal
Erica Wood / Dublin Wind Symphony

Ask composer Dr. Nicole Piunno how she would describe her new work Eternity in an Hour, and one particular word comes up again and again: joy.

“There’s a lot of joy in the piece,” Piunno said in a recent phone interview. “It starts with joy and it ends with joy.”

color photo of the members of the Formosa Quartet
Sam Zauscher/publicity photo / http://www.formosaquartet.com/images-1/

Their career spans East and West, and Friday morning it brings them to us – live on Classical 101.

black-and-white photo of flutist jacqueline Cordova-Arrington, violist Matthew Lipman and harpist Bridget Kibbey performing in the Classical 101 studio
Siwoo Kim/VIVO Music Festival

About this time last year, the first-ever VIVO Music Festival took place in Columbus, featuring Columbus-raised classical musicians now at the cusp of promising performing careers. To mark the return of the VIVO Music Festival to Columbus (Aug. 31-Sept. 4), some of the festival’s musicians joined me in the Classical 101 studios earlier this week to give us a preview of this year’s festival.

In case you missed that exclusive live performance on Classical 101, here's your chance to sample the 2016 VIVO Music Festival.

color photograph of Bridget Kibbey wearing black sitting at her harp
publicity photo / http://www.bridgetkibbey.com/#photos

It’s one of those great ironies that international harp soloist Bridget Kibbey might not be the rising star she is today had she not grown up in Ohio.

publicity photo / http://www.johnstulz.com/info.html

After all of the featured performers of this year’s VIVO Music Festival arrive in Columbus later this month – after the performance venues have thrown open their doors, the tickets have been bought and the audiences have gathered – violist, composer and VIVO Music Festival co-artistic director John Stulz won’t be there.

At least, not in the traditional sense.

photo of the curved palm of a left hand in chiarosuro lighting
Andreas Levers / Creative Commons/Flickr

Charlemagne did it. So did Jimi Hendrix, Cary Grant and “Shoeless” Joe Jackson.

What, exactly, did these wildly disparate souls have in common?

They all wrote with their left hands.

Of course, lefties have been around since the proverbial cavemen and -women drew left-handed on cave walls. But to an avowed righty like me, southpaws still carry a certain mystique. What marvel of genetics makes 10 percent of the population use their left hands, instead of their right, to reach for cookies in the cookie jar, pie in the sky and jam on the lower shelf?

color photo of the members of the Cypress Quartet standing outdoors on stone steps
Basil Childers / Cypress String Quartet website

Sunday afternoon the members of one of the world’s great string quartets will go their separate ways after 20 years together on the international concert stage.

Paul Stocker/Creative Commmons/Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/paalia/3942059926/in/photolist-ovsebG-pLqj4U-krbQP5-dhknAy-otCjBL-oeajJm-otCmj3-ovo2YX-oxq5pp-oxq6Ui-qqS4hf-pLqj4d-71m65s-djQZsq-fzTSUP-puYGP-fo9oXL

It's that time again. This weekend, June 10-12, art lovers and sun worshippers will flock to the downtown Columbus Riverfront like the swallows at Capistrano to take in art by hundreds of visual artists, writers, dancers and musicians. And Classical 101 will be there, too.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

A previous episode of The Mozart Minute saw the 14-year-old Mozart composing his opera Mitridate, rè di Ponto on commission and for performance in Milan amid all manner of envy and intrigue. How Wolfgang the boy wonder secured a commission for such a large work at such a tender age is a story in its own right.

color photo of a Fender bass guitar decked out with keys from a clarinet and metal tubing fomr a French horn
Artist website / http://www.brianriegel.com/gallery/newwork.shtml

For Columbus artist Brian Riegel, musical instruments don’t just make art – they are art.

A sculptor who transforms found objects into whimsical artworks, Riegel has in recent years become something of a pied piper for cast-off musical instruments.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

Leopold Mozart’s earlier tours to promote his musical children had gone so well that he repeated the experiment, taking Wolfgang alone on three trips to Italy. On one of those tours, father and son spent four months in Milan, where the 14-year-old Mozart composed his opera Mitridate, rè di Ponto on commission to open Milan’s 1770-71 opera season.

color photo of a clarinet lying across a piano keyboard with a copy of sheet music for Jeanjean's 18 Etudes behind
David Thomas

David Thomas is principal clarinetist with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra. He usually performs in concert halls. But recently, he gave a house concert in the east Columbus home of two of his associates.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

In a previous episode of The Mozart Minute, the Mozart family’s stay in the Netherlands almost turned tragic. But not only did everyone survive, the young Mozart actually thrived in Holland, making himself popular with Dutch royalty and composing a clutch of new musical works.

black-and-white photo of Lindsey Goodman holding her flute and standing infront of a light-colored door in an exterior brick wall
http://www.lindseygoodman.com/#!untitled/zoom/c1zim/i51kgu

What do a baby and a new musical work have in common? Flutist and mezzo-soprano Lindsey Goodman can tell you.

color image of a black ol-styl phone wiht handset resting in a white modem "cradle."
Brian Alexander / Creative Commons/Flickr

Do you remember the sound of a dial-up modem? Kind of R2D2 and Darth Vader all rolled up into one gurgly, bloop-bleep bridge of white noise that could take you beyond these four walls and out into the big, wide world online. Now that sound has inspired a brand-new choral work.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

From 1763 to 1766, Leopold Mozart and his wife, Anna Maria, were touring their prodigiously gifted children through western Europe, making their talents known at some of Europe’s most important courts. Also on this trip, illness brought one of the children to the brink of death.

color photo of Rachel Barton Pine sitting down and playing her violin in the chancel area of St. Paul's UCC, Chicago
artist publicity video/YouTube

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine’s playing isn’t the only sound you hear on her new recording, Testament: Complete Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin by Johann Sebastian Bach (Avie Records). The venue in which Pine made the recording had a voice from the beginning of the project, and shines forth as a brilliant collaborator on the new disc.

color photo of the facade of Cincinnati's Music Hall
Hannaford/Creative Commons/Flickr

Routine renovation work on Cincinnati’s Music Hall – home of the Cincinnati Symphony, the Cincinnati Pops, the Cincinnati Opera and other performing arts organizations – has unearthed human bones on the work site, according to the Cincinnati television station WCPO.

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