The Amadeus Deli

Weekdays noon-1pm

Want some Mozart for lunch? Join Jennifer Hambrick weekdays at noon for music by Mozart and his friends in the Amadeus Deli.

Paul Stocker/Creative Commmons/Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/paalia/3942059926/in/photolist-ovsebG-pLqj4U-krbQP5-dhknAy-otCjBL-oeajJm-otCmj3-ovo2YX-oxq5pp-oxq6Ui-qqS4hf-pLqj4d-71m65s-djQZsq-fzTSUP-puYGP-fo9oXL

It's that time again. This weekend, June 10-12, art lovers and sun worshippers will flock to the downtown Columbus Riverfront like the swallows at Capistrano to take in art by hundreds of visual artists, writers, dancers and musicians. And Classical 101 will be there, too.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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A previous episode of The Mozart Minute saw the 14-year-old Mozart composing his opera Mitridate, rè di Ponto on commission and for performance in Milan amid all manner of envy and intrigue. How Wolfgang the boy wonder secured a commission for such a large work at such a tender age is a story in its own right.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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Leopold Mozart’s earlier tours to promote his musical children had gone so well that he repeated the experiment, taking Wolfgang alone on three trips to Italy. On one of those tours, father and son spent four months in Milan, where the 14-year-old Mozart composed his opera Mitridate, rè di Ponto on commission to open Milan’s 1770-71 opera season.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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In a previous episode of The Mozart Minute, the Mozart family’s stay in the Netherlands almost turned tragic. But not only did everyone survive, the young Mozart actually thrived in Holland, making himself popular with Dutch royalty and composing a clutch of new musical works.

color image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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From 1763 to 1766, Leopold Mozart and his wife, Anna Maria, were touring their prodigiously gifted children through western Europe, making their talents known at some of Europe’s most important courts. Also on this trip, illness brought one of the children to the brink of death.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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If you’re a genius working on your latest masterpiece, you have to take some time off once in a while to stop and smell the roses. Or to stop and drink beer.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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The saying goes, a picture paints a thousand words. But a picture of Mozart's wife inspired baby talk from her genius husband.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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Oscar Wilde once said “all bad poetry springs from genuine feeling.” If true, then the poem Mozart wrote for his sister on her thirty-second birthday was steeped in brotherly love.

image of a color portrait of Mozart wearing a bright red coat
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During Mozart’s life, many a pet dog and even a pet bird wagged and flapped their way into the composer’s heart – and, it seems, into his music, as well.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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If you've followed The Mozart Minute, then you know that Mozart's stay in Paris was pretty much a flop. He had hoped to establish himself as a composer in Europe’s musical capital, but that didn't happen. And in at least one incident, envy and petty rivalry seem to have kept one of Mozart’s new works from being premiered on a major Parisian concert series.

image of a portrait in which Mozart wears a bright red coat
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After being sacked by the Archbishop of Salzburg Hieronymous von Colloredo, Mozart held his erstwhile employer in notoriously intense disregard. His disdain was so intense, in fact, that even discussing an improvised performance of some variations (which possibly became the variations K. 359, 360, or 352) at a concert for the Archbishop was enough to set Mozart off.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a birght red oat
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Even as Mozart was establishing himself Vienna as a freelance composer and performer, his new musical compositions were also establishing themselves among the world’s great masterworks. Here’s how Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor, K. 466 made its way into the world.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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It was an open secret in Mozart's day, as in ours – Mozart didn’t like his job at the Salzburg court of the Archbishop Hieronymous von Colloredo. Mozart’s letters are full of colorful rants about the archbishop. Here’s the story about the day it all blew up.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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As a freelance musician with a growing family, Mozart couldn’t afford to hide his light under a bushel, and in any event he was never one to be bashful in the first place. With musical gifts as phenomenal as Mozart knew his to be, he didn’t hesitate to put his flashiest skills on display, as he did even before the Holy Roman Emperor in one particular performance that he spiced up in a special way.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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As a freelance musician more often than not short on cash, Mozart learned early on that, when it comes to making do-re-mi, if you don't succeed, the only thing to do is try and try again.

color photo of the keyboards of a two-manual harpsichord
Ching / Creative Commons/Flickr

Yesterday, a recently discovered collaborative musical work by Mozart and other composers was heard for the first time in more than 200 years, according to BBC News.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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In the final year of his life, Mozart composed his piano variations on the aria Ein Weib ist das herrlichste Ding – "A Wife Is the Most Glorious Thing" – from a Singspiel by his friend the singer and composer Benedikt Schack. Judging solely from Mozart's correspondence, Schack's aria could easily have served as Mozart's personal theme song.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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After Mozart left - or, rather, was sacked from - his Salzburg court job, he had to make it as a freelance musician in Vienna. To stay in the game and keep the wolf at bay, Mozart organized and performed concert series of his own music, including one in 1784 that gave him much to brag about.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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For all the partying Mozart seems to have done, he definitely had his prudish side when it came to the company he kept. Just ask Mozart's colleague Antonio Brunetti.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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It’s a pairing that could only have formed in the mind of Mozart – the genius composer’s elegant, even dainty flute quartets and flute concertos juxtaposed with some of his raunchiest writing.

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In Mozart's day, as today, it felt good to get compliments on a job well done. One episode in Mozart's life shows that getting props is enough to make even a genius right chuffed.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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As a freelance composer, Mozart was all for having his music performed. But before it could be performed, the music had to be copied from Mozart’s originals. And Mozart didn’t trust the copyists any farther than he could throw them.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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As Christmas nears, you might be finding yourself wrapped up in the spirit of the season, searching for that perfect gift for each and every one of your special people. You might also find yourself at once enjoying quality time with family, and quietly grateful that the holidays roll around only once a year.

It didn’t take Christmas to cause Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to do some good, old-fashioned re-gifting, or to bring occasion for some family politicking. On March 23, 1782, Mozart wrote from Vienna to his father that he enclosed with his letter some gifts for him and for Nannerl, Mozart’s older sister. One of those gifts was a rondo Mozart composed for his Piano Concerto K. 175.

image of a color portrait of Mozart wearing a bright red coat
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This episode of The Mozart Minute was first published on Oct. 23, 2015 at wosu.org/classical101.

Mozart's 1778 stay in Paris was pretty much a total washout. Instead of making his name there as a composer, he was rebuffed and ignored. His mother died. He was cold and starving. And people kept stiffing him for his work.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a birght red oat
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It is quite possibly the most recognizable movement from Mozart's piano concertos. With its rolling triplet feel over the spring of gentle pizzicatos, the second movement of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467 wafts along like a cloud drifting in a summer sky. Musicologist David Grayson calls the movement "a sonic dream world" and writes that "it offers moments of sublime beauty and ends in a state of bliss, but its surface serenity cannot conceal the turmoil that lies beneath."

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

This episode of The Mozart Minute was previously published on May 29, 2015 at www.wosu.org/classical101.

More than 200 years after its premiere, Mozart's opera The Marriage of Figaro remains one of the best-loved comic operas in the repertoire. And if you think people like Figaro today, you should have seen - and heard - the audiences in Mozart's day.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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It's an interesting irony – Mozart composed his Symphony No. 33 (K. 319), with its vivacious opening and beginning-to-end loveliness, before a backdrop of impending financial disaster and professional dissatisfaction.

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Mozart wrote the opening chords of his so-called "Paris" Symphony (Symphony No. 31) specifically to pander to French expectations, which is not to say to pander to French taste. Mozart didn't think the French had any taste. He also thought they were ridiculous for thinking that symphonies that begin this way were especially French.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
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Mozart's elegant “Haffner” Serenade was first performed at a grand and resplendent celebration. But one later performance ended in nothing short of debauchery.

image of a portrait of Mozart in which he wears a bright red coat
Wikipedia

Mozart's 1778 stay in Paris was pretty much a total washout. Instead of making his name there as a composer, he was rebuffed and ignored. His mother died. He was cold and starving. And people kept stiffing him for his work.

While in France, Mozart had to take on private students to pay the bills. One of those students was the daughter of Adrien-Louis de Bonnières, the Duc de Guînes. The duke was nonchalant about compensating the struggling Mozart for his work. On July 31, 1778, Mozart wrote his father of one such unsavory episode.

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