All Sides with Ann Fisher

Weekdays 10am to noon on 89.7 NPR News

All Sides with Ann Fisher is a two-hour, daily public-affairs talk show designed to over time touch upon all sides of the issues and events that shape life in central Ohio. Listeners participate via telephone, e-mail, Facebook and Twitter to add to the conversations. As always at WOSU, the coverage is fair and balanced with a civil tone.

Watch All Sides, weekdays from 10am to noon

Columbus Arts Festival: the Business of Art

Jun 9, 2017
The Columbus Arts Festival
Paul Cook / Flickr

How does an artist make a living? Many artists are talented and creative, but the trick is to turn that creativity into a business successful enough to make a living. 

Broadcasting from the Columbus Arts Festival in downtown Columbus, we will sit down with a panel of experts to talk about the business of art. 

Wellness Wednesday: Sports Injuries

Jun 7, 2017
Athletic trainer tends to a injured soccer player
Jon Candy / Flickr Creative Commons

Sports medicine highly impacts the sports we watch. To keep players in the game, healthcare professionals have to come up with new techniques for surgeries, rehabilitation and prevention.

With children participating in sports at an earlier age, parents worry their children will develop the same injuries as the pros. 

Today, we'll talk about what's new in wellness and with Dr. David Geier about sports injuries and his book, “That’s Gotta Hurt: The Injuries That Changed Sports Forever." 

What's Next for the ACLU?

Jun 7, 2017
Michael Hanscom / Flickr

The American Civil Liberties Union has a long history of defending individual freedoms — whether the cause is popular or controversial — and even when it puts the ACLU on the same side with organizations they frequently oppose.

 Last week, for example, the ACLU called foul when the Portland mayor canceled a right-wing gathering.   Coming up, the national president of the ACLU talks about their priorities for the next few years. 

ipad with a cup of coffee
kaboompics / Pixabay

Airbnb has become a convenient fallback position for scores of travelers who prefer the so-called online sharing economy. Last year, the company implemented a nondiscriminatory policy, but a Rutgers University study has revealed that Airbnb hosts are still more likely to reject queries from disabled travelers.

 Today on Tech Tuesday: disability discrimination in the sharing economy. Also, the risks of cryptocurrency such as Bitcoins, and news from the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference.

Ohio Sues Five Drug Makers Over Opioid Crisis

Jun 6, 2017
pills
Pixabay

Attorney General Mike DeWine filed a lawsuit against five drug companies on Wednesday, May 31. He believes evidence will show that these drug companies used deceptive methods to sell their products to doctors and patients.

DeWine says these methods caused thousands of Ohioans to become addicted to painkillers.  In 2015, Ohio was first in the nation for the number of opioid deaths.

Today we will talk about Ohio's lawsuit and the opioid crisis.

Inside the World of Wine

Jun 5, 2017
Wine poured into a glass
Torsten Dettlaff / Pexels

Wine. Does it make you think of aroma, color, additives? Those are just a few of the components that wine experts must consider when they judge a bottle. How they use their senses to do their job is the subject of a new book. It tells the story of their struggles and what they give up to fully taste the wine. 

Author and journalist Bianca Bosker joins us to talk about her new book:  Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me How to Live for Taste. 

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jun 5, 2017
Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has filed a lawsuit against five pharmaceutical companies, accusing them of selling addictive painkillers to doctors and patients and largely contributing to the state’s growing opioid crisis. Last year more than 4,100 Ohioans died from unintentional drug overdoses.

 Join us today as we discuss the lawsuit and the latest in state and national politics with a panel of reporters.

All Sides Weekend: Chefs in the City

Jun 2, 2017
bread
Scott Bauer / Wikimedia Commons

Bread. You buy it at the store or the bakery, maybe the farmers market. You grab it from a basket on the table at the restaurant. But all breads are not created equal.

Breadmaker, teacher and author Sarah Black of Flowers and Bread in Clintonville shares her vision of great bread.

Plus, the usual reviews and observations from WOSU food critics Stephan Stover and Rich Terapak Sr. Join us.

Bhutanese-Nepali Refugees in Central Ohio

Jun 2, 2017
Alemaugil / Wikimedia Commons

More than 20,000 Bhutanese-Nepali refugees have settled in Ohio since the 1990s. As they've integrated into Columbus and the surrounding communities, their stories have become intertwined with the history of central Ohio.

One documentary photographer has documented 30 of their journeys with the help of a writer for an exhibit opening this month. Join us today as we discuss the experiences of the Columbus Bhutanese-Nepali refugee community.

Teen Advice Columnist

Jun 1, 2017
SinclairTarget / Wikimedia Commons

The trials and tribulations of adolescence can be stressful and overwhelming for girls. That keeps advice columnists like Carol Weston busy. She has dedicated over 30 years to helping young girls through her advice column in the Girls' Life magazine. From everyday relationships to grief and death, Weston has covered it all. 

 Today we talk about her work as an advice columnist and her new novel, "Speed of Life."

The White Working Class

Jun 1, 2017
Multhaupm / Wikimedia Commons

Working class Americans. They helped propel Donald Trump to the White House. And that got law professor Joan Williams thinking on election night.

The essay she produced talked about what political elites, including the folks who run campaigns, are missing when it comes to working class America. She has expanded the essay to a new book. We’ll talk about that today.  

Genetic Testing

May 31, 2017
LEON BROCARD / Flickr

23andMe was the first genomic company to receive FDA permission to provide consumers with information about potential genetic diseases or conditions, giving it a leg up over other companies in the genetic testing industry. Genetic testing can catch diseases and illnesses, giving doctors extra time to prevent or treat conditions they might not have otherwise caught in time. However, genetic testing companies are having to contend with issues like privacy and testing during pregnancy. Today we'll discuss the merits of genetic testing and the ethical issues it raises with a panel of guests.

Republican Health Care Bill

May 31, 2017
Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The Congressional Budget Office released its assessment of the latest version of the Republican health care bill. According to the report, around 23 million people would lose their insurance coverage by 2026. House Speaker Paul Ryan says his plan will cut premiums, but critics warn that the bill would have the opposite effect for those who are ill or have pre-existing conditions.

 Join us today as we talk about the latest version of the House Republican health care bill and what we can expect from the Senate.   

Tech Tuesday: Drone Summer Camps, Big Three Tech Giants

May 30, 2017
Android phone
Pixabay

When summer comes, many kids get ready to spend more time outdoors at camp. One company has developed STEM-themed camps where children explore engineering and flight by using drone technology. The drone summer camps aim to use this technology for hands-on learning activities both inside and outside. 

Join us today as we learn more about drone summer programs, the Big Three tech giants and what's new in tech.

The Danger of Lead in Ohio

May 30, 2017
Texas National Guard members distributing water in Flint, Michigan.
Master Sgt. Daniel Griego / U.S. Department of Defense

The next two-year Ohio budget is being proposed with a controversial new amendment that would give sole authority to the Ohio Health Department in overseeing the reduction of lead use. From lead-contaminated water in Flint, Michigan to 51 houses with known lead hazards in Columbus alone, the regulation of lead is an issue we will need to tackle whether it be at the state or local level. 

Join us today as we discuss the dangerous impact of lead in Ohio. 

David McCullough On The American Spirit

May 29, 2017
Petr Kratochvil / Public Domain Pictures

What is the American spirit during a period of polarization? Historian David McCullough characterizes the American spirit through a series of his own speeches given over the last 25 years in his new book, "The American Spirit: Who We Are and What We Stand For". 

 Join us today as we discuss this and how American values have changed over time impacting what we consider the American identity. 

Could Donald Trump Be Impeached?

May 26, 2017
Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Since reports of President Trump's alleged attempt to interfere to stop the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn, some critics are claiming it constitutes obstruction of justice and grounds for impeachment. Others are approaching the topic with caution as many details are still uncertain. Join us today as we discuss what qualifies for impeachment, and the possibility of a Trump impeachment. 

Arbor Day and Tree Preservation

May 26, 2017
tree
USFWSmidwest / Flickr

Arbor Day is an annual day of observance for the promotion of tree planting, care and preservation. Unfortunately, many tree species in the Midwest and across the country are facing rapid decreases in numbers due to disease and pest invasions. Today we'll discuss the best ways to care for trees and how to choose and plant them with a panel of guests.

A Lesson with Grammar Girl

May 25, 2017
Oakhurst Dairy building
John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

How much is the Oxford comma worth? According to the state of Maine, $10 million. That's how much Oakhurst Dairy had to pay their workers when a class action lawsuit caused the court to reconsider the meaning of Maine's overtime law due to a clause that was missing an Oxford comma. 

Join us today as discuss this, the origins of certain colloquial phrases and grammar tricks and tips. 

Housing Shortage in Central Ohio

May 25, 2017
Home sale sign
Dan Moyle / Flickr

The median price for a central Ohio home rose 7.1 percent to $180,000 in April, which is great for the seller. For buyers, that higher price is in part a function of a lack of housing stock and can be especially hard for first timers. 

Join us today as we discuss the decline in housing starts nationally and the housing shortage in Central Ohio.

Wellness Wednesday: Facebook, Patient Advocates

May 24, 2017
iPhone with social media apps
Christiian Colen / Flickr

After a newborn arrives, a new parents’ Facebook feeds can to explode with adorable photos, well wishes and pithy observations on early childhood. It can be fun to share but research has shown that when new mothers become too focused on those posts, they are more likely to experience stress and unhappiness. According to Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan and her team from The Ohio State University, people post these photos to seek validation as parents.

Join us today as we talk about Facebook and parenting, parents looking toward untested treatments and patient advocates. 

The Role of Arab States in Terrorism

May 24, 2017
President Donald Trump meets with King Hamed bin Issa of Bahrain during their bilateral meeting, Sunday, May 21, 2017, at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Shealah Craighead / The White House

A day before the Islamic State claimed the terror attack at a concert in Manchester, England, President Trump spoke at the Arab-Islamic-American summit in Saudi Arabia where he urged Muslim world leaders to increase their efforts in combating terrorism. How will the Gulf states respond to the threat of international terrorism?

Join us today as we discuss this, the role of terror in the Middle East, and the U.S.-Middle East relations on terrorism. 

Tech Tuesday: Net Neutrality, Online Memorials

May 23, 2017
laptop
Unsplash / Pexels

During the Obama administration, internet providers were not allowed to slow down or block websites for consumers. The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to loosen regulations on internet providers. The commission is Republican-led, and Democrats worry that softening regulations will lead to internet providers abusing their position of power.

Join us today as we discuss Net Neutrality and online memorials.

Could Donald Trump Be Impeached?

May 23, 2017
Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Since reports of President Trump's alleged attempt to interfere to stop the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn, some critics are claiming it constitutes obstruction of justice and grounds for impeachment. Others are approaching the topic with caution as many details are still uncertain.

Join us today as we discuss what qualifies for impeachment, and the possibility of a Trump impeachment. 

Columbus' Endangered Buildings

May 22, 2017
Cooper Stadium was the long-time home of the Columbus Clippers until the team moved downtown to Huntington Park in 2009.
Thomas Bradley / WOSU

The Columbus Landmarks Foundation created a list of historic buildings in danger of being demolished or facing irreparable damage. The goal of this list is to make the community aware of the buildings and the historical significance they hold.

Cooper Stadium, former home to the Columbus Clippers, is on the 2017 list, and the plan to convert it to an auto racing facility has been put on hold.

Join us today as we take a look at the endangered buildings of Columbus.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

May 22, 2017
Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

A new bill was introduced that would reduce the penalties for carrying a concealed handgun in safe-zone areas. Currently, carrying a concealed weapon in certain areas, such as universities, police stations and school safety zones may result in a fine and possible jail time. The new bill would eliminate those penalties for citizens who have a concealed carry permit and bring their gun to a gun-free zone. 

Today we discuss this, Ohio's online harassment ban, the state's economy, worker's compensation and the latest in state and national news. 

All Sides Weekend: Books

May 19, 2017
Books
Pixabay

Join us today with guest host Christopher Purdy as he talks with a panel of guests about the latest in book news in the Columbus area.

Eisenhower and McCarthy

May 19, 2017
Major General Dwight Eisenhower
Imperial War Museum / Wikipedia Commons

The division between the two major political parties often takes away from the internal conflicts within the those parties.

Between 1953 and 1954, his first two years in office, Republican President Dwight Eisenhower came under the scrutiny of Sen. Joseph McCarthy who had already begun his campaign against those in office he believed were tied to the Communist Party.

Join us today as we speak with author David Nichols about the internal party conflict between President Dwight Eisenhower and Sen. Joseph McCarthy, and the parallels between McCarthy's politics and Trump's rhetoric.

David McCullough On The American Spirit

May 18, 2017
American Flag
Petr Kratochvil / Public Domain Pictures

What is the American spirit during a period of polarization? Historian David McCullough characterizes the American spirit through a series of his own speeches given over the last 25 years in his new book, "The American Spirit: Who We Are and What We Stand For". 

Join us today as we discuss this and how American values have changed over time impacting what we consider the American identity. 

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents

May 18, 2017
Big Brothers Big Sisters Volunteer
NPDOC Edwards Lifesciences Big Brothers Big Sisters / Flickr

Mentors can play a big part in the life of a youth, providing someone for them to look up to and maybe give them another perspective on life. Children of an incarcerated parent face a different set of challenges. And if both parents are incarcerated, the child could face the foster care system. A Columbus-based leadership group is working to raise funds to provide life-long mentors for children of incarcerated parents.

Join us today as we talk about the value of mentoring children and teens.

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