All Sides with Ann Fisher

Weekdays 10am to noon on 89.7 NPR News

All Sides with Ann Fisher is a two-hour, daily public-affairs talk show designed to over time touch upon all sides of the issues and events that shape life in central Ohio. Listeners participate via telephone, e-mail, Facebook and Twitter to add to the conversations. As always at WOSU, the coverage is fair and balanced with a civil tone.

Watch All Sides, weekdays from 10am to noon

All Sides Weekend: Books

Sep 23, 2016
condesign / Pixabay

Today guest host Christopher Purdy discusses new reads with a panel of other bookworms.  Among the books to be discussed is The Reactive by Masande Ntshanaga, and Don't Go Back by Lina M. Ferreira.

The Politics of White Christian America

Sep 23, 2016
Joel Bradshaw / Wikimedia Commons

Historically, white Christian Americans have had strong influence over political trends and elections. In the past decade however, there's been a notable decrease in the demographic, altering the American political landscape. The effects of this change are being revealed in the current presidential election.

Caring for Sick Pets

Sep 22, 2016
Ukieiri / Pixabay

Today at 11am

A recent distemper outbreak that spread throughout Franklin County Dog Shelter resulted in the euthanization of at least 84 dogs at the shelter. But detecting an illness in pets can be tricky, although certain changes in behavior can be signifiers. This hour, we explore how to identify when a pet is sick.  

 

tpsdave / Pixabay

Today at 10am

This week, WOSU and NPR stations across the country are participating in a national week of conversations called A Nation Engaged. We’re asking this question:  “What can we do to create economic opportunity for more Americans?”

Recent U.S Census Bureau data shows that median incomes are up and poverty is down, but here in Ohio 1 in 5 children live in poverty. Central Ohio is often cited as region of economic resilience, but research shows that Columbus ranks among the worst cities in upward mobility. This hour, a conversation about creating economic opportunity for children born into poverty.

How the American Diet Defines Us

Sep 21, 2016
Pexels

Not only do most Americans live within 20 miles of a Starbucks, they also have about 87,000 drink options at one of those nearby locations. American diets are often focused on convenience, but also tend to emphasize choice. The psychology of what and how Americans eat can reveal what we as a culture, and as individuals, value. 

The Evolving Role of the American Military

Sep 21, 2016
Sgt. Brandon D. Bolick / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Military has changed its mission. Back during World War II, it was about battles and winning. Everybody understood. Now, the mission is less clear. Post 9-11, the war is never ending, and there’s no particular nation target. The role of the military is constant, but not always about battles and winning. Coming up, the evolving role of the military in a changing world with law professor, former pentagon official and author Rosa Brooks.

Tech Tuesday: E-Books, Self-Driving Ubers, and Kid's Tech

Sep 20, 2016
Foo Conner / Flickr

Uber unleashed four self-driving cars to the streets of Pittsburgh last week. The partnership with the ride-share company is part of the city’s plan to brand itself as a tech friendly hub. Uber is speeding ahead in the race against competitors like Google, which don’t have plans to unveil autonomous cars till 2020. Plus, a look at trends in e-book reading and a guide on choosing a smartwatch for kids.

The Heroin Epidemic's Impact on Children

Sep 20, 2016
East Liverpool Police Department

In early September, police in East Liverpool, Ohio, posted a photo of a 4-year-old boy in the backseat of a car while his grandmother and her boyfriend were passed out in the front, unconscious from an apparent heroin overdose.  The photo was posted to shed light on how the heroin and opioid epidemic is impacting children in that northeastern Ohio city. East Liverpool is not alone. And as the number of overdoses in Ohio increases, social service agencies and addiction recovery centers are stepping up efforts to help the children left behind.  

The Slaves of U.S. Presidents

Sep 19, 2016
Daniel Zimmermann / Flickr

Slavery is rooted in American history, including the history of the presidency. Ten of the first fifteen U.S. presidents were slave owners, or grew up in a slave owning household. George Washington once bought teeth from enslaved people to be worn in his dentures. This hour, we discuss the lives and stories of the men and women owned by past presidents. 

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Sep 19, 2016
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Polls indicate that Democrat Hillary Clinton has lost her post-convention bump, and that her race with Republican Donald Trump is tightening. Plus, the U.S. Supreme Court officially denied Ohio Democrats attempt to reinstate Golden Week, the period in which Ohio residents could register to vote and also cast their ballot early. Also today, we discuss the latest updates regarding the fatal shooting of 13-year-old Tyre King by a white Columbus police officer. 

All Sides Weekend: Arts

Sep 16, 2016
Jrdphotography / Wikimedia Commons

For the second time, the Columbus flagship performing arts organizations are joining forces. Opera Columbus, BalletMet, and the Columbus Symphony will come together for a sequel performance of their successful show, Twisted. Also, VSA will be hosting an Arts and Autism Conference next week.

August Wilson's Fences

Sep 16, 2016
Flickr

American baseball remained segregated up until the moment Jackie Robinson stepped on the field in 1947. Before that, black Americans competed in the Negro leagues, which folded upon integration.  August Wilson's play Fences takes place shortly after integration.  The play tells the story of an ex-Negro league baseball player, his bitterness and its effect on his family.  Fences is sixth in Wilson's ten-part "Pittsburgh Cycle," which explores the African-American experience over the course of a century.

Fall Bird Watching in Ohio

Sep 15, 2016
John Harrison / Wikipedia

If the birds out your window start to get a bit noisy it’s because September is peak fall migration time for songbirds. Birding during fall migration is a bit trickier than Spring, as the birds coloring is muted. Despite the subtlety, there's still plenty to see in the next coming months.  Join us today to discover the ins and outs of Ohio birding in the fall. 

The Crackdown on For-Profit Colleges

Sep 15, 2016
Dwight Burdette / Wikimedia Commons

ITT Technical Institutes closed its 137 campuses across the nation last week after 50 years in operation.  The move arrives after the U.S. Department of Education said ITT would be barred from enrolling students who use federal financial aid. The ITT closures leave thousands of students scrambling for the next option and raise doubts about the future of for-profit colleges and universities, which have been criticized for high loan default rates and deceptive recruitment strategies.  

Wellness Wednesday

Sep 14, 2016
Eddie Harrison / Wikimedia Commons

Hillary Clinton captured headlines this week after she appeared to nearly collapse during a 9/11 memorial ceremony in New York City. Her doctor later revealed that she had been diagnosed with pneumonia the previous Friday. But pneumonia is common and treatable. More than two million Americans are diagnosed with a mild form of the infection every year.

Zero Tolerance Policies in Schools

Sep 14, 2016
Brad Wilson / Flickr

Suspension and expulsion rates in schools have exploded over the last two decades in part because of so-called Zero tolerance policies.

Now, educators and activists point to the negative and unintended consequences of zero tolerance, its connection to the school to prison pipeline and how it disproportionately affects the lives of young men of color and inner-city kids.

Jeroen Akkermans / Flickr

Twenty years after Congress signed it into law, the Communication Decency Act’s protection of websites is being challenged. Refugees are using smartphones and social networks for survival and to find resources in Greece. Apple is releasing the new iPhone 7 as well as the Apple Watch Series 2, unveiling controversial new features. 

Health Issues and the Presidency

Sep 13, 2016
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

After Hillary Clinton excused herself from a memorial service commemorating 9/11 in New York City on Sunday, someone captured video of her appearing to collapse as she boarded a waiting van. Hours later, her staff revealed Clinton had been diagnosed with pneumonia a few days earlier. The illness comes at a time when Trump supporters have been heavily scrutinizing Clinton over her health.  Clinton's hesitation to reveal her illness may fall into line with a long history of politicians sheltering their medical conditions.

Ohio State in the Sixties

Sep 12, 2016
treevis / Flickr

Ohio State's campus is a vastly different place today than it was 50 years ago.  Social movements were shaping the campus and student body throughout the 1960’s. Equal rights for women, civil rights and antiwar sentiments fueled tensions that eventually erupted in violent protests and rioting in 1970. 

 

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Sep 12, 2016
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Clinton and Trump continue to battle it out in Ohio, while voters interest in third party candidates is increasing.  Medical marijuana is now legal in the state, but it could take up to two years before patients can get their hands on the drug. Also, a new abortion proposal could make it's way to the ballot. 

August Wilson's Fences

Sep 9, 2016
Flickr

American baseball remained segregated up until the moment Jackie Robinson stepped on the field in 1947. Before that, black Americans competed in the Negro leagues, which folded upon integration.  August Wilson's play Fences takes place shortly after integration.  The play tells the story of an ex-Negro league baseball player, his bitterness and its effect on his family.  Fences is sixth in Wilson's ten-part "Pittsburgh Cycle," which explores the African-American experience over the course of a century.

The Psychology of Con Artists and Their Victims

Sep 9, 2016
readersdigest.com

Today at 10am

People like to think they could spot a con artist, but these artists are often masters at disguising their true purposes. A successful con artist is an excellent deceiver who knows exactly how to read, and prey on, their victims. Coming up, learn more about the people who con and the people who get conned.

Teaching 9/11 in the Classroom

Sep 8, 2016
Boss1000 / Wikimedia Commons

Today at 11am

It's been fifteen years since the terrorist attacks of September 11th. Most of today’s students were not yet born or were too young to remember that day’s tragic events.  That means many of them will learn about the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in a classroom, which can be challenging subject matter for teachers.

Presidential Nominees Foreign Policy

Sep 8, 2016
CrimsonScholar / Wikipedia

Today at 10am

The next U.S. commander in chief will be faced with making tough calls on national security, the military and foreign policy. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton says her experience has prepared her to take on the role. Republican nominee Donald Trump argues threats to the nation require someone who is willing to use force, while also putting an end to nation-building strategies. 

Steve Buissinne / Public Domain Pictures

Today at 11am

After years being one of the most obese states, Ohio is finally on the decline.  On a national scale, Suicide rates have risen drastically in the past decade or so.  Depression may be going unnoticed in most adult sufferers. Also, the FDA has released new regulations banning 19 chemicals from future use, specifically those found in antibacterial soap.  The cosmetic industry could enter a battle with the FDA concerning future regulations. 

Issues Facing the U.S. Congress Upon Return

Sep 7, 2016
Wikipedia

Today at 10am

Congress returned back to Washington with a near record low approval rating on Tuesday.  The most immediate topic expected to be discussed is an aid package to help combat Zika.  Congress will also have to how to prevent another government shut down by the time funding ends on the 30th.  Republicans are expected to introduce legislation in reaction to the Obama administration's 400 million payment to Iran after a nuclear deal was reached.

Mark Warner / Flickr

Today at 11am

The Kardashians are always sharing and boasting about new products.  These woman, and other "influencers" are being paid a great deal to promote certain products, and audiences often don't appreciate it. Also, Uber continues to expand and hopes to grow to be number one for public transport. And, the iPhone 7 is set to be released this week, leading to speculation about it's new features. 

American Symbols and Politics

Sep 6, 2016
Pixabay

Today at 10am

Football player Colin Kaepernick chose to sit down during the national anthem to protest the treatment of black citizens in the US. The protest ignited both backlash and support throughout the nation.  The flag, national anthem and other American symbols are emblems of patriotism, seen as sacred by some, and used as fodder for political protest and debate.

Millennials in the Workforce

Sep 5, 2016
Pexels

Today at 11am

One in three American workers is a millennial and research suggests that changing the workplace.  Millenials have a reputation for being self-involved and entitled, but those stereotypes don't capture the truth about this new generation of workers. From flexible working hours to using text messages to communicate with co-workers, Millenials are affecting the way we work.

All Sides Weekend: Chefs

Sep 2, 2016
Harvest Pizzaria / Harvest Pizzaria Facebook

Join guest host Marilyn Smith on All Sides Weekend as we take a look at good eats in Columbus.  Restaurant owner, Chris Crader is in the studio to discuss the obstacles and benefits of opening a new restaurant. 

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