Sarah Taylor

A Northeast Ohio native, Sarah Taylor graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio where she worked at her first NPR station, WMUB. She began her professional career at WCKY-AM in Cincinnati and spent two decades in television news, the bulk of them at WKBN in Youngstown (as Sarah Eisler). For the past three years, Sarah has taught a variety of courses in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State, where she is also pursuing a Master’s degree. Sarah and her husband Scott, have two children. They live in Tallmadge.

In November, Ohioans will decide whether or not to amend the state constitution with a provision that addresses how the state handles drug offenders. Issue 1, which is titled To Reduce Penalties for Crimes of Obtaining, Possessing, and Using Illegal Drugs, would add a new Section 12 to Article XV of the Constitution of the State of Ohio. The official language of the proposal is here:

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Betsy Rader

Dissatisfaction with current elected officials has led a number of newcomers to jump into the political arena this midterm election. One of the biggest challenges they face is raising enough money to run a competitive campaign.

Dissatisfaction with current elected officials has led a number of newcomers to jump into the political arena this midterm election. One of the biggest challenges they face is raising enough money to run a competitive campaign.

Just ask long-time Democratic political consultant and author Jerry Austin.

Big money

This week, 20,000 Portage County children are taking home a resource guide aimed at fighting the addiction epidemic that has claimed nearly 200 lives in the county since 2012.

The guide was developed by the Record-Courier newspaper and features information about new efforts to treat addiction through a program developed at University Hospitals Portage Medical Center in Ravenna.

David Dermer / Associated Press

Tuesday, Sept. 25 is National Voter Registration Day. Some groups are working hard to encourage voters to register and cast ballots in the midterm election this November.

Tuesday, Sept. 25  is National Voter Registration Day. Some groups are working hard to encourage voters to register and cast ballots in the midterm election this November. But midterms are not always a big draw. Professor Dave Cohen, assistant director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, talks about how this year is shaping up. 

President Trump tweeted today about the woman who’s accusing his Supreme Court nominee of sexually assaulting her. The president says if the incident had occurred, there should have been charges filed.

Up to now, Trump has not commented on the accuser. University of Akron political scientist Dave Cohen says that was a better strategy.

“By the president interjecting himself it just reminds people not only of the actual thing that Judge Kavanaugh is being accused of, it also reminds people that the president himself has about 19 or so accusations against him.”

Ohio Senator Rob Portman supports the Senate’s plan to hear additional testimony next week on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, though he's not happy about it. 

Questions about Kavanaugh have surfaced after a woman came forward this week claiming he sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers.

The woman, now identified as college professor Christine Blasey Ford, told Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein about the incident over the summer, but Feinstein never shared the information because Ford wanted to remain anonymous.

A Summit County program that helps veterans who’ve been charged with a felony is getting a big financial boost.

Valor Court is a program for non-violent felons who have served in the military. Susan Sweeney, assistant court executive officer, says there are a lot of them.

“They’re there. It’s just a matter of having the program capacity to meet the needs.”