Nick Houser

Chief Content Director - Digital Media

Nick Houser leads the digital media team and oversees all things digital, including wosu.org, columbusneighborhoods.org, digital content, the WOSU Public Media Mobile App, social media, enewsletters, podcasts and on-demand video.

Nick has extensive experience in the journalism, digital and communications fields. He came from Ohio State’s Fisher College of Business where he served as web content manager and before that he was the college’s public relations coordinator.

Prior to joining Ohio State, he was an Associated Press Society of Ohio award-winning journalist at the Xenia Daily Gazette, The Chronicle-Telegram in Elyria and the Delaware Gazette. Nick holds a Bachelor Degree in Journalism from The Ohio State University.

Ways to Connect

Join us for an Independence Day celebration on Classical 101 for Fourth of July music. Listen to American music and selections inspired by our nation's birthday. Symphony at 7 with John Rittmeyer will be all-American with Star-Spangled Symphony, American Suite and Song of the Liberty Bell. Get the perfect accompaniment to the fireworks on your radio, computer or the WOSU mobile app. Have a happy and safe holiday!

Join WOSU Public Media, Classical 101 and ProMusica Chamber Orchestra for a day of musical activities, crafts and a free performance open to the Columbus community. Youth and Family takes place Saturday, May 10 from 12:30-4 p.m at WOSU@COSI. A concert with ProMusica Chamber Orchestra and local youth will take place at 3 p.m. Also, come say hi to your favorite Classical 101 hosts. Join us for this great event.

PROGRAM: Kronos Quartet & Superhuman Happiness: Suite from How to Survive a Plague (world premiere) Kronos Quartet, Abena Koomson & Sahr Ngaujah: Fela Kuti, "Sorrow, Tears and Blood"

Time For Three: Tiny Desk Concert

May 5, 2014

Pigeonholing the classically trained string trio Time for Three isn't easy, but that's also a blessing. The musicians — violinists Zachary De Pue and Nick Kendall with double bassist Ranaan Meyer — say they love a kaleidoscopic spectrum of music. "If we like it, we play it" is their motto.

Not unlike childbirth, the odyssey of fits and starts that preceded the completion of Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles hurt like hell at the time. But today, 10 years later, Angelenos marvel on a daily basis at architect Frank Gehry's dazzling offspring: the incandescent beauty of its billowing metallic sails, especially at dusk, in L.A.'s famed purple-pink fading light; its iconic status as an architectural symbol of the city and its warm and vibrant acoustics.

When Daniel Hope was a boy, the only thing he loved as much as his violin was his telescope. Gazing into the night sky, he pondered the vastness of space. Now a grown man, Hope still has a penchant for wonder and discovery — especially when it comes to music.

These days, Lawrence Brownlee spends most of his time on the stages of the world's great opera houses. That's where you'll find him singing Rossini and Donizetti. His supple, strong, high-flying voice can negotiate the tightest hairpin turns with grace and elegance; that, and his ability to command the stage as an actor, has won Brownlee the praise of critics worldwide. But as much as he excels at opera, there's a special place in Brownlee's heart for African-American spirituals.

Last March, when the San Francisco Symphony was slated for an East Coast tour, including a stop at Carnegie Hall, the musicians went on strike. Fortunately, the labor dispute was settled in 18 days — a blink of an eye compared to the recent drawn-out disruptions in Minnesota and Detroit. Still, it left New Yorkers hungry for the San Francisco Symphony's brand of tonal luminescence and programming bravado, nurtured by forward-thinking conductor Michael Tilson Thomas.

Composer Benjamin Britten, whose 100th birth anniversary falls on Nov. 22nd, is so deeply associated with his native England that he's on a new 50-pence coin issued by the Royal Mint.

Kronos Quartet: Tiny Desk Concert

May 5, 2014

Sunny Yang joined Kronos Quartet in June 2013. Now, just five months later, the cellist she says she's learned quite a few new works — not just a handful, but about 70 pieces. That degree of dedication to contemporary composers, coupled with an insane concert schedule, has propelled Kronos Quartet forward over the past four decades.

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