Nick Castele

Democratic nominee for Ohio governor Richard Cordray visited a manufacturing site in Cleveland on Tuesday and talked about his small business plans.  

Cordray met with business leaders for a closed-to-press session at Magnet, a manufacturing incubator that receives state and federal funding.

The former federal consumer protection chief then toured the facility on the eastern edge of downtown. Founders of some of Magnet’s startups showed off their products. Cordray handled lightweight “smart mulch,” inspected adaptive clothing for seniors and sampled Cleveland Whiskey.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

The Northwest Ohio candy company behind Dum Dum lollipops bought the maker of NECCO Wafers and Sweethearts in a bankruptcy auction this week.

Spangler Candy Company, based in Bryan, Ohio, made a winning offer of $18.8 million for New England Confectionery Company of Revere, Massachusetts.

The deal is expected to close Friday.

NECCO filed for Chapter 11 earlier this year after two packaging companies and a logistics firm took it to court over $1.6 million in unpaid debts. 

Attorneys handling hundreds of lawsuits over the opioid crisis say they’re making progress in discussions between local governments and drug companies.

U.S. District Judge Dan Aaron Polster held a brief public hearing today to discuss the suits brought by cities, counties, Native American tribes and others against drug makers and distributors.

Nick Castele / ideastream

Voters on May 8 have a chance to change the way Ohio draws Congressional maps. Issue 1 would require more bipartisanship in a line-drawing process that currently has few rules.

Associated Press

The Democrats running for Ohio governor made closing pitches to Northeast Ohioans on Saturday, debating before a standing-room crowd of about 200 in Cleveland Heights.

The local governments suing drug companies over the opioid crisis say addiction has cost them—not just in damage to people’s lives, but in dollars and cents.

It’s hard to come up with a price tag, though. Numerous different agencies handle prevention, treatment and response to overdoses. The federal government, state of Ohio, foundations and local communities are all paying for the epidemic.

While the crisis hasn’t broken local budgets in the Mahoning Valley, it has burdened them, agency officials say.

Stopping Opioids At The County Jail

This week the Agriculture Committee in Congress looks at stricter work requirements for food stamps as part of the larger farm bill

In the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, able-bodied people without kids can receive food stamps for three months without having to work. After that, they’ve got to get a job or be enrolled in job training for at least 20 hours a week.

People are exempt from those rules if they are pregnant, younger than 18 or older than 49.

There’s a lot at stake in this year’s midterm elections in Ohio.

Republicans are trying to unseat Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown. Democrats hope to break the GOP control over the governor’s office and other statewide positions. Nationally, majorities in Congress hang in the balance.

Helping us put the pieces together is Kyle Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

On competitive Congressional races in Ohio

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

As the year comes to a close, candidates are already lining up for next year’s Congressional races – with the seats of both U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi and U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci up for grabs.

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