Nick Castele

The leader of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus joined with some Cleveland City Council members and other local officials to support Issue 1 at a news conference Thursday morning.

The proposed constitutional amendment would reduce penalties for drug possession, reclassifying lower-level felonies as misdemeanors. It would also allow incarcerated people, with some exceptions, to shorten their prison sentences by taking part in job and education programs.  

Ohio governor candidates Democratic Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine speak to reporters following their third debate at Cleveland State University.
Angelo Merendino / AP

Richard Cordray and Mike DeWine tussled over healthcare, drug sentencing laws and support for local government in their third gubernatorial debate Monday night.

Ohio Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine (right) talks with Ohio Public Radio's Andy Chow at the Talk Jobs with Ohio's Next Governor forum in Cleveland on Thursday.
Stuart Pearl

Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray, the two major-party candidates for Ohio governor, fielded questions from students and young adults on Thursday about jobs and education.

A new report says Downtown Cleveland has capacity for thousands more housing units, but is lagging in homeowners and should work to preserve affordable housing options.

The report, released Wednesday, was prepared by consulting firm Urban Partners and commissioned by the Downtown Cleveland Alliance, a nonprofit that advocates for the neighborhood.

Housing Demand Expected To Continue

Downtown population has grown about 56 percent since 2010, and the researchers expect continued demand for market-rate housing.

One of Cuyahoga County’s drug court judges joined Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine in opposing opposing state Issue 1, which would reduce penalties for drug possession.

Judge Joan Synenberg, who presides over one of the county’s two drug dockets, spoke alongside DeWine at a campaign event Monday.

Drug courts put defendants on a plan to receive treatment in exchange for having their case dismissed. Fifty-five counties in Ohio have at least one drug docket.

County boards of elections in Ohio are bringing in experts to size up whether their computer systems are vulnerable to hackers.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The ACLU of Ohio is taking aim at laws against panhandling in dozens of cities across the state, as part of a nationwide effort coordinated with the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions traveled to Cleveland on Wednesday to announce a series of actions against people accused of illegally distributing opioids.

The steps by the Justice Department target two Ohio doctors, two Chinese citizens and a number of others.

“Today’s announcements are a warning to every trafficker, every crooked doctor or pharmacist, every drug company, every chairman and foreign national and company that puts greed before the lives and health of the American people,” Sessions said.

A confidential government database of drug sales has become crucial to the nationwide opioid lawsuit in federal court in Cleveland.

The Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders System, known as ARCOS, recorded painkiller sales between manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies at a time when overdose deaths surged nationwide.

Lake County Commissioners are considering a resolution expressing support for Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers.

That and another resolution on immigration drew dozens of people to commissioners’ chambers for a meeting on Thursday. After a lengthy hearing, commissioners tabled the measures until the next meeting on Aug. 16.

A judge Thursday morning granted bond to several of the men arrested by immigration agents six weeks ago at Corso’s garden center.

The government accused them of being in the country unlawfully. The men’s bonds ranged from $6,500 to $12,000. If they can come up with the money, the men will be free while their cases move forward.

Where are they being held?

The men are at Northeast Ohio Correctional Center, a private prison in Youngstown that Immigration and Customs Enforcement has been using for detentions since 2016.

Immigration arrest at a garden center in Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Trump administration has reversed a years-long decline in immigration arrests in Ohio and Michigan, sweeping up people previously considered lower priority for deportation, according to government figures and interviews with attorneys.

The lighthouse on Lake Erie in Lorain, Ohio at sunset.
Rona Proudfoot / Flickr Creative Commons

A long-running project to build a wind farm in Lake Erie has won approval from the staff of a state board overseeing electric facilities.

Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James is leaving his hometown team once again.

The four-time NBA most valuable player has signed a four-year, $154 million contract with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Quicken Loans Arena is in the middle of a $140 million renovation, about half financed by the public. The Cavaliers wanted to update the Q for the future—but now that future won’t include the star who carried the team to multiple NBA Finals.

Democratic nominee for Ohio governor Richard Cordray visited a manufacturing site in Cleveland on Tuesday and talked about his small business plans.  

Cordray met with business leaders for a closed-to-press session at Magnet, a manufacturing incubator that receives state and federal funding.

The former federal consumer protection chief then toured the facility on the eastern edge of downtown. Founders of some of Magnet’s startups showed off their products. Cordray handled lightweight “smart mulch,” inspected adaptive clothing for seniors and sampled Cleveland Whiskey.

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