Mike Thompson

Chief Content Director - News & Public Affairs

Mike Thompson spends much of his time correcting people who mispronounce the name of his hometown – Worcester, Massachusetts. Mike studied broadcast journalism at Syracuse University when he was not running in circles – as a distance runner on the SU track team.

Mike has worked in public and commercial radio and television in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio earning numerous awards for investigative, enterprising, and feature reporting.

Mike earned an MBA from Ohio State and uses that knowledge to program 89.7 NPR News and manage Ohio’s best radio news staff. At home it’s Mike’s wife Mary who puts up with him.

They have teenage twins- William and Madeleine. Because Will and Maddie now want very little to do with their father, Mike has found the time to resume his running career and competes in the Columbus Marathon and other races. (By the way it’s WUH-Ster or WUH-Stah in the vernacular.)

Ways to Connect

As the City of Columbus copes with falling tax revenues and a rising budget defecit, employees continue to contribute little for their benefits. The amount of money Columbus employees pay each month for health insurance is far below the national average. Last month the Kaiser Family Foundation released its national health insurance premium survey. It found the average American in 2003 paid $200 a month for family health insurance coverage. City of Columbus employees pay no where near that amount. Most city employees pay about $50 a month for a family plan.

Six months after an arson killed five college students near the Ohio State University campus, the arsonist remains at large. University officials and police have announced a new poster campaign for information in the case.

John Kleberg of Ohio State's office of studnet affairs says the message of the posters is clear: police still want information, any information about the night of April 13th.

Two Ohio State students and three Ohio University students died after someone set fire to the 17th Avenue house in which they were sleeping.

The Greater Columbus Chamber of Commerce has a new president. It's Ty marsh, who currently serves as Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman's chief of staff.

Chamber executives cited Marsh's knowledge of the community and the chamber of commerce as well as his economic development experience.

Marsh has worked as Coleman's chief of staff since January of 2000. Before that he served as a senior vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. Marsh replaces Sally Jackson who resigned earlier this month. He begins his new job in December.

The parent company of Big Bear grocery stores has announced it will close 5 stores in the Columbus area. The stores will cease operations by the end of the year. The move is part of Penn Traffic's plan to emerge from bankruptcy.

American Electric Power says it is surprised a federal agency filed a lawsuit against the company alledging the utility manipulated natural gas prices to make millions of dollars.

In a statement AEP says it is cooperating with the Commodity Futures Trading Comission and hopes to reach a settlement.

Last year, AEP fired five employees who the company says submitted innacurate gas trading information to trade publications. AEP says it has no indication that any current employees were involved in the activities.

Central Ohio has become a disaster relief staging area . Dozens of 50 Red Cross emergency response vehicles are assembling in Reynoldsburg to respond to areas affected by hurricane Isabel.

Frank Kominoski and Essie Gardner of Indiana pulled their Red Cross truck into a Reynoldsburg hotel parking lot that was quickly filling up with disaster relief vehicles.

A blue Conrail diesel locomotive slowly pulls a long line of cars out of the Buckeye Yard owned by CSX. The rail yard is an expansive facility. At its widest point. More than a dozen sets of tracks wide. Dozens of trains picking up and delivering goods use the facility every day.

After a summer-long investigation, the Ohio State University athletics department has decided what to do with Maurice Clarett.

OSU athletics director Andy Geiger announced Clarett would be suspended for the season. Geiger disclosed Clarett violated the NCAA rule that prohibits him from accepting gifts as a college athlete. He says Clarett accepted thousands of dollars in gifts but he would not say exactly how many thousands of dollars. Geiger also said Clarett lied to NCAA and university investigators on 14 different occasions, violating the NCAA ethics rule.

Sunday will be a great day of music at the Germain Amphitheater, a who's who in the music industry will take the stage at Polaris for Farm Aid 2003. The day-long jam session will benefit family farms in Ohio and across the nation. The list of performers includes Dave Matthews, Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp and Sheryl Crow. Farm Aid concerts began in 1985 but this is the first time Ohio will host the event. Proceeds from the event will pay for programs to promote family farming and locally grown produce. Farm Aid also provides emergency assistance to the owners of family farms.

A Lewis Center couple has some new mouths to feed. In a span of four minutes Candace and Tom Sweeney went from having no children to having five children. Candace Sweeney gave birth to quintuplets last night at Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus. Doctors delivered four girls and their lone brother within in four minutes. Hospital spokesman Mark Hopkins says the first baby, Adriana, was born at 10:44, followed by Alyssa, Bryce, Olivia, and Serena. Tom Sweeney says the babies are doing well.

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