Kevin Niedermier

More of Cleveland’s streets will be resurfaced this year thanks to last November’s city income tax increase. Wednesday, city officials talked about the new paving program.

Some Ohio cities have the nation’s widest employment and income gaps between whites and blacks.  Those are the findings in a new report by the National Urban League. Out of 71 cities studied, Toledo ranked 70th in unemployment with a gap of more than 15 percent. Cleveland is 68th with Akron ranked 51st. The three cities also all rank near the bottom when it comes to wage inequality.

Cleveland police are not doing enough to control dirt bike riders illegally using city streets, according to Councilman Zack Reed. And he says that is leading to more brazen behavior from the riders. Police officials say a new policy is on the way.

Akron City Council has unanimously approved legislation that adds more local control to Ohio’s legalization of medical marijuana.

Cleveland Clinic president and CEO Toby Cosgrove announced today that he is stepping down. After almost 13 years as head of one of the world’s largest health care institutions, Dr. Cosgrove says he will begin transitioning out of the position but is expected to continue in an advisory role. Cleveland Clinic officials plan to pick a successor before the end of the year.

A petition drive is underway to stop the city of Cleveland from spending $88 million to help renovate Quicken Loans Arena. The Cuyahoga County Progressive Caucus, Greater Cleveland Congregations, and two service unions want voters to decide if the city should help fund the upgrades. What happens if they’re successful is uncertain.

Cuyahoga County Council has approved an additional $200,000 for this year’s medical examiners budget to deal with the rising number of fatal opioid overdoses.

City of Cleveland

The nation’s first publicly funded inner-city dirt bike park is being built in Cleveland, with hopes of redirecting the swarms of dirt bike riders illegally using city streets. Backers say the park will reduce a dangerous nuisance, and generate revenue and create jobs. Others say the money could be better spent.

The nation’s first publicly funded inner-city dirt bike park is being built in Cleveland with hopes of redirecting the swarms of dirt bike riders illegally using city streets. Backers say the park will reduce a dangerous nuisance, and generate revenue and create jobs. Others say the money could be better spent. 

The City of Akron has appointed its first Health Equity Ambassador to help decrease racial and ethnic health disparities.  Mayor Dan Horrigan has appointed Tamiyka Rose to the position. The mayor’s chief of staff, James Hardy says Rose will first focus on lowering the high infant mortality rate in the city’s African-American community.  Hardy says her job will be coordinating the many existing programs now working on the issue.


Ahead of tonight’s scheduled Cleveland City Council vote, city officials and the Cavaliers have announced enhancements to the financing deal to upgrade Quicken Loans Arena. Some groups have opposed spending tax dollars on Q renovations unless the same amount is spent on neighborhood projects.                                        

A Cleveland man who spent 23 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit went free today thanks to new forensic evidence.

Kevin Niedermier / WKSU

The three-day search for Steve Stephens ended Tuesday morning with Stephens killing himself after a brief pursuit by Pennsylvania State Police near Erie, Pa.. Stephens was accused of randomly shooting and killing an elderly Cleveland man on Easter Sunday and posting the gruesome video on Facebook.

Police say Steve Stephens killed himself late this morning after a brief police chase near Erie, Pa. He had eluded capture since Sunday when he allegedly fatally shot 74-year-old Robert Godwin Sr. and posted it on Facebook.

Kevin Niedermier / WKSU

Authorities are hoping a reward will help them capture the man accused of shooting an elderly man at random Sunday and posting the grizzly footage on Facebook. Mayor Frank Jackson is asking anyone with information on Steve Stephens to come forward.

Authorities are hoping a reward will help them capture the man accused of shooting an elderly man at random Sunday and posting the grizzly footage on Facebook. Mayor Frank Jackson is asking anyone with information on Steve Stephens to come forward.

“There is an award of up to $50,000 for the arrest of Mr. Steve Stephens. The money comes from the FBI, the ATF and the marshal's service.”

This story was updated at 3:34 p.m., April 17: Authorities are offering a $50,000 reward as the search for Steve Stephens stretches past 24 hours.

There's still’s no sign of the Facebook shooter Steve Stephens, who posted a video of himself targeting and killing an elderly Cleveland man yesterday afternoon.

More help is coming for people caught up in Cuyahoga County’s growing opioid epidemic. The YMCA of Greater Cleveland has received funding to add beds to its transitional housing program for recovering addicts.

The executive director of the Y-Haven program, Ed Gemerchak, says the $200,000 from the Cleveland Foundation is a big boost to the 23-year-old program, which now serves 113 homeless men.

Cleveland City Council is expected to vote tonight on committing the city’s share of funds to help pay for $140 million in upgrades to Quicken Loans Arena.  Backers say the 22-year-old arena must be modernized to stay competitive and attract events that generate money for the entire community.  But if the measure passes as expected, opponents may try to stop it on the ballot.

The Cleveland Indians home opener yesterday marked the 24th consecutive time the event has sold out at Progressive Field. But the fans expectations for the season are higher after the team nearly won the World Series last year. 

A brass band welcomed fans to the home opener at Progressive Field, where the Tribe lost game seven of the series last season. Maria Contini of Dover says this season’s goal is simple.

The opioid epidemic has intensified the call for alternatives to narcotics for people with acute and chronic pain.

In last week’s State of the State, Ohio Governor John Kasich said he wants to put more money toward finding other options. He recommended devoting $20 million to help Ohio researchers develop new technologies to fight pain.

The defending American League Champion Cleveland Indians’ home opener is tomorrow afternoon against the Chicago White Sox. WKSU’s Kevin Niedermier takes a look at some what fans can expect.

Downtown Cleveland has about 300 restaurants and cafes to serve the area’s growing population and tourism trade. Downtown officials are not concerned that more eateries will over-saturate that market.

A campaign to combat prescription opioid addiction, and believed to be the first in the country, kicked off today in Cuyahoga County. The education effort includes coordinated ads and special print and broadcast programing, with input from a wide range of resources.

Cleveland’s agreement with the Justice Department to reform the city’s police force is one of 14 across the country U.S. Attorney General  Jeff Sessions wants to review. Sessions says such consent decrees taint entire police departments because of a few bad cops. But as WKSU’s Kevin Niedermier reports, Cleveland officials believe the 2015 agreement remains the best path to real reform.

Starting tomorrow, the speed limit on county roads in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park will go down from 55 miles per hour to 35. 

This year’s early spring has put a slight dent in Northeast Ohio’s overall maple syrup yield. But for producers who tapped their trees early, it has been a good season.

President Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to the U.S. EPA are raising concerns about federal help for cleaning up and reclaiming brownfields. One organization closely watching the potential loss of funding helps developers with brownfield sites in Summit County.

The city of Akron is replacing its paper-based personnel files with a software package to monitor the behavior of its safety forces. City council this week approved spending $43,000 for the program to track the use of force, tardiness, public complaints and other matters. 

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