Karen Kasler

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Gov. John Kasich is sounding off on the lack of movement on gun regulations that he’d proposed earlier this year, commenting on it in two separate public events.

The Republican candidate for governor says he’s had a plan to keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. His Democratic opponent calls that a major about-face. And it shows there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding this key state policy, and what either candidate will do with Medicaid expansion if he is elected.

Gov. John Kasich is sounding off on the lack of movement on gun regulations that he’d proposed earlier this year, commenting on it in two separate public events.

A docked boat is reflected in the algae-covered water of Lake Erie's Maumee Bay in Oregon, Ohio in this Sept. 15, 2017, file photo.
Paul Sancya / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich has signed an executive order that could end up creating new regulations on fertilizer used by farms in the western basin of Lake Erie, which he says it will help stop toxic algae blooms from developing.

Ohio Republican Governor candidate Mike DeWine speaks while running mate Jon Husted looks on.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it.  Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

Gov. John Kasich has signed an executive order that could end up creating new regulations on fertilizer used by farms in the western basin of Lake Erie, which he says it will help stop toxic algae blooms from developing.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Ohio's candidates for governor appear to have different approaches on how they’d pay for infrastructure, as construction costs rise and gas tax revenue declines.

The candidates for governor appear to have different approaches on how they’d pay for infrastructure, with construction costs going up and gas tax revenue declining.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A national group that advocates for so-called “Right to Work” policies is threatening to sue Ohio if it doesn’t stop collecting dues from non-unionized state workers.

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